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Betelgeuse


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4 hours ago, cubinator said:

Time enough for the lead scientists to send a text to their colleagues - "Go get your solar glasses. Now!"

Neutrino detectors are the ones that will give us precise timing on that. In fact, that's the only way we've been able to predict supernovas in the past.

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1 hour ago, StrandedonEarth said:

Okay - now I'm waiting for the Webb data!  (They make a pretty good argument that Betelgeuse is interesting enough to warrant observation time... but I'm guessing there's a LOT of frustrated career-DM theorists who are claiming priority for looking way back into the way back).

 

Still - that's been one of the more interesting astronomy stories to follow; thanks for sharing!

 

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5 hours ago, StrandedonEarth said:

I'm still holding out faint hope that it still might go supernova sometime within my lifetime, purely for selfish reasons.   But I'll be really be upset when it does happen, it'll be during the northern hemispheric winter. 

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400 times the energy thrown out by Sun's CME's! :0.0:

Too bad nobody managed to catch that super-flare. That person would be thoroughly freaked-out, thinking that Betelgeuse is going supernova right before their eyes.:cool:

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So, when the super-mighty  flare (or the coming bigger explosion) highlights the Betelgeusian Kuiper and Oort bodies from below and maybe evaporates some of them, can we see this?

It would prove/disprove the Oort cloud existance at all.

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4 minutes ago, kerbiloid said:

So, when the super-mighty  flare (or the coming bigger explosion) highlights the Betelgeusian Kuiper and Oort bodies from below and maybe evaporates some of them, can we see this?

It would prove/disprove the Oort cloud existance at all.

I'm not sure we have that level of resolution.  After all, we're still detecting planets via EM spectrum changes as they transit the star.  Even Webb's 'imaging' of Wasp 96 b was inference rather than direct observation.

Webb Reveals Steamy Atmosphere of Distant Planet in Detail – Exoplanet Exploration: Planets Beyond our Solar System (nasa.gov)

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3 hours ago, JoeSchmuckatelli said:

I'm not sure we have that level of resolution.  After all, we're still detecting planets via EM spectrum changes as they transit the star.  Even Webb's 'imaging' of Wasp 96 b was inference rather than direct observation.

Webb Reveals Steamy Atmosphere of Distant Planet in Detail – Exoplanet Exploration: Planets Beyond our Solar System (nasa.gov)

We actually can resolve Beetlejuice as a disc, with the VLT and ALMA.

Don't have links to papers right now, but when you search "Betelgeuse image VLT" or ".. ALMA" you'll find it :-)

 

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13 hours ago, Gargamel said:

I'm still holding out faint hope that it still might go supernova sometime within my lifetime, purely for selfish reasons.   But I'll be really be upset when it does happen, it'll be during the northern hemispheric winter. 

I’m confused. I thought you were in the northern hemisphere, and Orion (the constellation containing Betelgeuse) is a winter constellation? Or are you not wanting to get cooked by the blast of gamma rays and other radiation??

A bigger threat is probably the wave of cosmic radiation (heavy atomic nuclei) tharwill be following at subluminal speeds, but I’m not a cosmologist…

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40 minutes ago, Pixophir said:

We actually can resolve Beetlejuice as a disc, with the VLT and ALMA.

Even with the glare on top.

Spoiler

Betelgeuse_captured_by_ALMA.jpg

Wait...
WHAT is illuminating Betelgeuse to cause this glare???
It's something another... something big...

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2 hours ago, StrandedonEarth said:

I’m confused. I thought you were in the northern hemisphere, and Orion (the constellation containing Betelgeuse) is a winter constellation? Or are you not wanting to get cooked by the blast of gamma rays and other radiation??

A bigger threat is probably the wave of cosmic radiation (heavy atomic nuclei) tharwill be following at subluminal speeds, but I’m not a cosmologist…

Yeah, I typo’d and meant to write summer.  

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1 hour ago, kerbiloid said:

WHAT is illuminating Betelgeuse to cause this glare???
It's something another... something big...

A star is not a billiard ball and that spot is not a specular reflection.

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6 hours ago, Gargamel said:

Yeah, I typo’d and meant to write summer.  

No typo. And no worries. When it blasts, it will any month be summer.

6 hours ago, Pixophir said:

A star is not a billiard ball and that spot is not a specular reflection.

I thought so before seeing this photo.

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On 8/12/2022 at 10:57 PM, Gargamel said:

I'm still holding out faint hope that it still might go supernova sometime within my lifetime, purely for selfish reasons.   But I'll be really be upset when it does happen, it'll be during the northern hemispheric winter. 

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Star_(Clarke_short_story)

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