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Trans-Kerbin Airways - Regional Jet Challenge 2: Electric Boogaloo


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@keptin  Thanks!  That was a fun read. FYI: Gogol is a writer...almost all K.R.A.S.S.H. craft (with the exception of the Squire above--named after my favourite bass player) are named for authors or literary characters.  Gogol is an amazing short story writer, but in light of your review, it should be noted that his only novel is called "Dead Souls."

 

btw: There are ladders.

 

 

Edited by Klapaucius
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18 hours ago, HolidayTheLeek said:

This would seemingly be impossible to achieve with the Firebird struggling to climb past 8000m. Thankfully, the Firebird also came with an instructional video, which ultimately proved more helpful than the deceptively simple flight instructions. Perhaps clearer instructions could become a feature on the production models.

After the third test flight, the Firebird finally reached optimum cruise speed and altitude. We found that the aircraft had already used a significant portion of its fuel during the climb. Cruise speed was lower than advertised at only 1030 - 1080m/s though, still blisteringly fast. With fluctuating fuel consumption during cruise, a conservative range of 2590km was calculated - lower than the minimum requirements for range. As for passenger comfort, the aircraft was slightly louder than the average airliner, but comfort overall during cruise was good. The aircraft had an unacceptably high wing-loading meaning that even gentle turns forced passengers to experience unexpectedly high G forces. High wing loading also meant dangerously high landing speeds and with the lack of airbrakes, the Firebird was difficult to land. The aircraft's immense weight but few wheels lead to high ground pressure. This combined with the long takeoff run, high landing speeds and lack of airbrakes limited it to long, well maintained, reinforced airfields.

Sir, I must protest! We at the TACo corporation did provide video evidence of the advertised cruise speed of at least 1300 m/s. Circumnavigating Kerbin proves that the range is at the very least equal to the planet's equatorial circumference of 3769km.

Seriously though let me know where you're having trouble. I think I should have mentioned that after reaching 450m/s, only raise the nose to a maximum of 10 degrees attitude. Once you reach 700 m/s, you can hold prograde until you're flying straight and level. This should get you up to 1300 m/s.

I will take this feedback and modify the design to make it easier to fly.

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TWIN CROWN AEROSPACE

 

Twin Crown Aerospace Industries decides to briefly re-enter the commercial aircraft market with newer production runs of its Mk2 commercial aircraft.

Although puzzled by TKA's technology restrictions compared to KEA's own contract requests, TCA has followed along and created another aircraft that will perhaps set the standard for all other commercial airliners. Though the offerings are much slimmer and un-varied as previous TCA catalogs, these aircraft are sure to be class-leaders.

 

AG 1: toggle engines

AG 3: toggle flaps

AG 4: toggle thrust reversers

AG5: toggle auxiliary power unit

 

A-504-1A-ER: Medium Capacity Long-Haul Airliner

:funds:70,109,000 ; 72 passengers max (executive layout) ; 250m/s (0.18 burn) @ 5700m = 3200km

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Similar to the A-403, except lengthened just a bit more to fit medium capacity standards. The engines, as necessitated by TKA's requirements, are Wheesley engines instead of the more modern, ultra-efficient Lotus engines. However, the performance ratings of the Wheesley engines are such that it can cruise at a higher speed, although if the trade-off is worth it is to be determined. Even still, the range is enough to fly the A-504 to any point on Kerbin.

Also opened up due to TKA's different requirements were the ability for more comprehensive wing controls, and an auxiliary power unit was added for ground operations.

Flight characteristics are favorable, with ~50m/s takeoff speed and decently responsive flight controls. While it can hardly said to be fast or powerful, the twin jet layout meets ETOP standards and can safely fly on one engine for extended periods of time.

 

 

A-301-2A: From Luxo-Liner to Utilitarian Hauler

:funds:34,629,000 ; 15t maximum recommended payload / 20t do not exceed payload ; 250m/s (0.18 burn) @ 5700m = 3200km

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Fleet sales continues to be the goal. To help promote fleet sales of the expensive A-504 luxury liner, TCA is offering a stripped-out version suitable for light freight duties, designated the A-301. It has downwards opening cargo bay doors at the rear to assist pallet loading from the ground. For heavier-equipped airports, top-opening cargo bay doors line the length of the aircraft for any long cargo that may be transported (such as rockets for a space program…).

Loading ramps from do not come standard from the factory, though may be offered as standard in future variants.

The A-301 is intended for light freight duties, primarily filling roles of mail carriers and such, with an average payload weight of 10-15 tons with fully loaded fuel tanks.

Flight characteristics are near-identical to the A-504.

 

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Valara Centurion - Small Regional Jet - $32,334,000

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Craft file: https://kerbalx.com/keptin/Valera-Centurion

Cruising Altitude: 9,500m

Cruising Speed: 290m/s

Range: 2625km

PAX Capacity: 40

Introducing the Centurion small regional jet, a new flagship aircraft from Valara. A refinement of earlier designs, the Centurion has been honed to compete in the luxury private jet and small regional jet markets. It stands out with its three-turbofan configuration sporting outstanding climb performance, and its automatic high-authority low takeoff maneuvering system affords pilots fighter-jet like control at low speeds. The Centurion's H-Empanage design gives pilots total authority over the aircraft in all conditions, and makes landing a breeze, even with a full compliment of passengers and crew. Incredible range and speed for this market segment, and all for $32M per aircraft. Affordable enough to form the backbone of a regional fleet. Learn about our bulk fleet pricing by contacting a Valara sales representative.

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Test Pilot Review: @Maxorin's BoWing model 727 medium regional Trijet 

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Figures as Tested: 727 passenger 

  • :funds: 336,224,000
  • fuel: 8360 kallons
  • cruising speed: 170 M/S
  • Cruising altitude: 4.5 KM
  • 0.96 KaL/s
  • Range ~1.5 KM

Figures as Tested: 727F

  • :funds: 336,224,000
  • fuel: 8360 kallons
  • cruising speed: 170 M/S
  • Cruising altitude: 4.5 KM
  • 0.96 KaL/s
  • Range ~1.5 KM

Review Notes:

The 727 is almost perfect in terms of takeoff speed, acceleration, pitch roll and yaw authority, exactly what you want in a passenger airliner jet, not too fast, not to much roll authority,  the triple slotted Fowler flaps help with that, though not as fast for deploying and undeploying as I would like. on par with any BoWing lane, this thing is a sturdy beast of a plane, able to take some rough landings, and water landings. the engines are also in a pretty good location,  all together means that maintenance can easily reach them all, and if an engine goes out, they aren't so far spaced that the plane starts to spin. passengers in an emergency can easily go out, and it has two exits / entrances for ease of getting out and in. landing gear is as sturdy as it should be. all around, a good plane. the passenger count is above average, and it flies smoothly.

 

The Verdict:

 

the plane is a little pricey for what it is, not that they go into combat, it just seems a little high. The range is average, which is always good, but for that price? Perhaps it should be able to go a little further.but If the pilot forgets about the low stall speed on the ground, the results can be disastrous, nevertheless, should not be a problem for someone who knows how these work. 

It is a beautiful aircraft, extremely appealing, and it flies amazingly, as well. The triple engine design is somewhat unconventional, but nice to see. the engines are somewhat high up, but that is no problem, because all the engines are close together.

The model 727 is very smooth to fly, the triple-slotted Fowler flap is costly to maintain, though. 

I would buy probably about 3 at the start, because they are quite expensive, see if customers like it, because of all the reasons that they should (I.E, the comfort, and the relative noiseless ride)  and 7 more if they do, the plane flies well if an engine cuts out, it glides well, and can land in the ocean if you are careful enough. The freighter variant is also useful in its own ways.

 

 

p.s, im sorry if this is somewhat bad of a review, its my first time, so please dont to too harsh

 

 

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Test Pilot Review: [@keptin 's JORG MANTABEAST]

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(Pictured: The JORG MANTABEAST flying over a desolate hellscape)

Figures as Tested:

  • Price::funds:402,094,000

  • Fuel: 16800 kal

  • Cruising speed: 200m/s

  • Cruising altitude: 8500m

  • Fuel burn rate: 1.10 kal/s

  • Range: ~3000 km

Review Notes:

When we got the invitation to test out a new plane of JORG Aviation, we must admit that we thought they had invited us to play with a pet demon from the way the letter was worded. When the plane came in for landing at our test site, we saw that we were indeed playing with a demon. The first thing that caught our attention was the absolutely whack design of the plane. 7 rows of cabins in parallel, 7 Wheesleys and 5 Goliaths. But perhaps what was most frightening was the wings. The outer wing parts were connected to the small tips of the inner wings. After our Chief Engineer saw this, he promptly passed out and the waiver had to be signed while he was unconscious.

When it was time to takeoff, the sounds of prayers promptly echoed throughout all 7 rows of cabins. What also echoed through the cabins were the intense vibrations and roar of the Goliath engines, with them being connected directly under the cabins, which made for a rather uncomfortable ride. Rather impressively, the beast was able to take off in 700m, Vr 60m/s and its pitch control was good. Its roll and yaw authority were sluggish but still alright. In another amazing feat, the plane was able to take off with only 1 Goliath and 3 Wheesleys, albeit not climbing very well.

The plane struggled a bit to get to the designated cruise altitude and maintain speed, but eventually it managed. Fuel consumption was lower than expected at this stage.

Apropos to structural integrity, it was during the manoeuvring tests that something completely unexpected happened. We had heard a single scraping sound and felt a sudden yaw to the right. Upon landing, it was found that the rightmost Goliath had actually broken off from the plane. Our naval response team eventually recovered the engine from the ocean and it was found that the connecting bolt to the wing was 'weaker than expected'. Furthermore, the connection points of the wing to the cabin were found to have had several cracks, likely due to stress. Our Chief Engineer estimated that had we put the plane into more extreme pitch manoeuvres, the entire wing assembly could have broken off. We also find that the single connector point to the nose landing gears is another point of concern, as we are uncertain that it will be able to take the stress of a potential hard landing.

During landing, despite the lost engine, the plane performed admirably, in part due to its massive wing area. It was able to land at 75m/s with a landing roll of 700m, shorter than expected for a plane of this size. We think that it can be made shorter by implementing more powerful brakes and incorporating thrust reversers.

In emergency testing, the plane was able to ditch quite well. It is also an amazing glider, and is able to run on half its engines, which is pretty impressive.

The Verdict:

Let's be blunt. On the maintenance side, this plane is an absolute nightmare. 12 engines, half of which are different from one another, not to mention the fact that the 7 Wheesleys are rather high up, makes maintenance a very difficult job. In addition to this, the 6 intakes run the entire length of the cabin rows. This makes intake maintenance very difficult.

Its cost is quite high, without a doubt, and we fear that the incredible amounts of maintenance will shoot it up even more and make this plane unprofitable.

On the plus side, it can transport an incredible number of passengers. While it does fall short a bit on range, it is still decently efficient despite the frankly ridiculous number of engines. However, its massive size means that it probably won't fit any of the gates, even at developed airports. In fact, the positioning of the exit hatches itself could cause problems for airports, which won't have the equipment needed to allow the passengers to board and deplane safely. Not to mention, the fact that the Goliaths are connected directly to the cabin rows makes for an extremely unfavourable ride for any passenger.

However, the overarching issue with this plane is its structural integrity. We simply cannot risk the lives of our passengers in this problem-ridden plane, where we are uncertain of it staying in one piece. None of us on the TKA test team want to step back onto that plane. Frankly, a hard landing might pop more Goliaths off, or even worse, break off the cabin rows completely. The collapse of the nose landing gear structure will also result in the nose slamming down onto the runway. At the height of the plane, the entire nose might be literally swept under the rug, if the rug was a plane, and ingested into the 5 Goliaths. Aside from these, the wings, especially the outer ones, might also break off from its supports of 3 thin wingtips. If the outer wings do break off, we guarantee you that the plane will encounter a very hard lithobrake.

To conclude, if you somehow manage to fix all of its safety concerns and make it a more comfortable experience, we'd consider buying 2 to parade around.

 

 

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Doug-Glass TBD Devastator

Medium range airliner/combi

Get it here https://kerbalx.com/KAS/Douglas-TBD-Devestator

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Just to check if you can really submit anything in this challenge, I'm going to put this up for sale. Manufactured by glass-ware company, Doug-Glass, the Devastator comes with 1 Tons of bombs cargo, and 2~3 passengers crammed comfortably seated in between the passenger and machine gunner. You can put spare passengers in the MG turret, but theres a huge risk in them A. Shooting in the dead-zone (rudder), or B. climb out of the turret, plummeting to their deaths

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As for safety features, each passenger is given one parachute, and a cassette tape with Blood on the Risers recorded on to it. This is to provide comfort, in the event of an emergency, when the need arises for the immediate evacuation of the plane. Self-sealing fuel tanks provide safety from incoming MG fire unplanned ignition, as the fire will engulf the plane. Another safety feature are seatbelts.

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Passengers are given a suite of luxury options on the flight. Like, a bottle of whiskey, which definately is not a farewell gift. Promise. For an extra fee, passengers can enjoy the in-flight entertainment of firing the 50. cal. machine gun.

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Range is excellent, with solar panels (which totally were not there for decorative purposes) allowing for mid-flight refuel of the electric engines, which also do not emit noise, unlike some of our other competitors. Unfortunately, I forgot to clip some batteries into the fuselage. so, yeah, keep that in mind. But there is 400 units of EC spare, just in case you need to make an emergency landing, when inevitably the sun does set. 44m/s is also rather slow, but, don't mind it.

  For further information, consult the brochure above

 

Gallery

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Edited by AVeryNiceSpacePenguin
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Welcome to your life the PTSLRA by L0kkiotech

Spoiler

Personel Transport Super Long Range Aircraft

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At the price of 37 935 000‬$ the PTSLRA is rated for ~4300km of flight @ 6500m 240m/s (FTAE disabled) and has a passenger capacity of 24. The craft can perform STOL operations with the use of thrust reversal and A front takeoff assistance engine which can be used to reduce takeoff velocity by 20m/s. The craft has excellent flight characteristics and can turn on a dime.

For short takeoff turn the FTAE to 90 degrees and start accelerating untill 50m/s, after that pull up. Accelerate to around 150m/s and climb at 10-20 degrees. You should not land at over 100m/s to prevent dangerous bouncing.

For controlling the aircraft several action groups are used
1 - To toggle the airbrakes
2 - To toggle thrust reversal
3 - To toggle the FTAE
F/B translate - to control the angle on the FTAE

https://kerbalx.com/l0kki/PTSLRA

Edited by l0kki
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When SubPar Industries got wind of a new proposal request from Trans-Kerbin Airways, we knew we had to enter some planes.

We present our flagship model, the S350 Long-Haul Airliner!

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(Pictured: SubPar Industries' S350-900)

You can purchase this jet for :funds:570,944,000 here.

Our team excitedly revisited SubPar Industries' "Temporary Aircraft Storage Hanger", known in the company as "The Junkyard". We assure you that the plane was not made out scrap parts, but that's what we're legally obliged to say to avoid a lawsuit.

The S350 is capable of incredible performance, much better than those stupid BoWing airliners. It has a passenger capacity of 240 Kerbals, and range is dependent on fuel load. More is elaborated on below.

 With a full fuel load [22250u] and full passenger load [240 Kerbals]:
 -Takeoff Distance 750m, Vr 60m/s, Flaps 10
°
 -Cruising Alt 7500m, Speed 200m/s, Fuel Burn 1.05 u/s, Range ~4000km
 -Landing Roll [VTD 70m/s @Flaps 20
° , Full Braking] 300m

 With a half fuel load [12250u] and full passenger load [240 Kerbals]:
 -Takeoff Distance 500m, Vr 45m/s, Flaps 10
°
 -Cruising Alt 8100m, Speed 190m/s, Fuel Burn 0.75u/s, Range ~3000km
 -Landing Roll [VTD 50m/s @Flaps 30
°, Full Braking] 200m

The S350 is fitted out with several groundbreaking technologies, guaranteed to improve the performance of the airliner. Perhaps most striking are the S350's wingtips, colloquially called "sharklets". We promise that these beautiful sharklets allow for an increased fuel efficiency.

Apart from the sharklets, another notable feature are the engine chevrons on the two turbofans of the S350. Our engineers tell us that these chevrons allow for smoother mixing of hot and cold exhaust, drastically reducing noise and allowing for a much more comfortable and silent ride for the passengers.

The PR department also overheard the Engineering Sector that they had integrated some substance into the composite parts of the S350, something along the lines of "ore". We don't understand much about it, but the engineers assure us that this substance greatly lowers the mass of the composites, allowing for greater efficiency.

We suspect you might complain about the price, which is comparatively high to the planes in this class. However, we assure you that, for one, we build it with the highest quality components available in the world (external claims that we use scrap parts are unfounded). For two, the ultra-high efficiency of this plane will result in break-even and increased profits over time.

 

The S350, the world's most efficient long-haul airliner, unbeatable in capacity and range by any other of its class. Especially those pesky BoWings.

 

 

Operation Manual:

AG1: Thrust Reversers

AG5: Toggle Engines

/[K]: Retract / Extend Flaps (respectively)

Beware of tailstrikes on takeoff and landing. The stated V-speeds should be followed as closely as possible.

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TWIN CROWN AEROSPACE A-501-1A-ER/A301-2A  -  TEST PILOT REVIEW

Kerbal_Space_Program_Screenshot_2020.05.

 

Figures as Tested: A-501-1A-ER

 

funds: 72,061,000

fuel: 8360 kallons

cruising speed: 277 m/s

Cruising altitude: 5,000 m

0.22 KaL/s

Range as calculated: 3105 km

 

 

--- 15th. of May 2020, 7:30am ---

“Why… Why do test flights always have to start early in the morning?” I thought to myself as I was walking up to our newest Prototype. It had only arrived at our Kerbol Field testing facility yesterday and the ground crew was already inspecting the plane.

“With the engines this low this is gonna be a breeze to service.”
“The suspension is so bouncy though, it almost looses it’s engines just bouncing on the runway! Someone must have set the dampers wrong.”
“I bet that’s just a prototype issue.”
“It’s even got an APU, so we finally don’t have to carry this huge cart across the fiels.”

All these were just a few voices I overheard as I was approaching the stairs leading up to the cockpit. The ground crew seemed to be particularly pleased with this plane. I must admit, I do like it too. It has a sleek design, powerful engines and it even has a Concorde inspired tail strike wheel in the back. This certainly made me less nervous to push this plane too it’s limits as I didn’t need to fear to scrape a hole into the airframe. I had to shake a few hands, but now I was finally on my way up the airstairs and towards the cockpit. I took a left turn in the spacious cabin and headed into the cockpit. A remarkably modern one as I immediately noticed by the sheer number of screens in it. They didn’t call it a glass cockpit for no reason. Soon my copilot came up next to me and sat down as he had just finished the obligatory walkaround.

“It’s a beautiful new plane huh?” I asked
“Well yeah, but it has a few little problems. I was looking at the tail section and there was a gap in it. I pointed that out to the ground crew and they just put some aviation grade duct tape over it.” He said, still a little puzzled.
“Guess our job is to pray this bird flies then.”

--Static noises—

“Tower, Proto501 Echo Tango is requesting permission for engine start”
“Engine start approved, advise ready for taxi.”
“Engine start approved, Proto501.”

And with that our engines roared to life. Well, roared is actually not really accurate, they were actually pretty silent due to their position on the aircraft. The rest of the engine start checklist and subsequent taxi seemed to rush by in seconds. This aircraft was simply beautiful, it handled great and it was easy to operate. Now it would have to prove its capability to fly though.

“Flight instruments?”
“Check.”
“Engines?”
“Check”
“Take-Off Data?”
“V1 40 m/s, VR 50 m/s V2 70 m/s.”
“Tower, Proto501 is ready for takeoff”
“Proto501, cleared for Takeoff, wind is calm. Good luck!”
“Thanks, we’ll need that.”
“Landing Lights?”
“On.”
“Strobes?”
“On.”
“Taxi Lights?”
“Off.”
“Before Take-Off checklist complete.”
“Let’s get this baby flying!”

I firewalled the throttles and the plane accelerated. Slower than what I had expected, but still remarkably fast for a plane this size. It was at this point that I realized we had no manual for this bird. It was supposed to be in the bin to the left of my seat, but apparently the manufacturer had failed to provide one. Still though, the plane flew with truly impressive performance.

(No, I totally didn’t loose motivation to write more.)

 

- - - - -  F I N A L   R E P O R T  -  A – 5 0 1 – 1 A – E R  - - - - -


P O S I T I V E:

-          Q U I E T

-          C O M F O R T A B L E

-          G O O D   C L I M B   P E R F O R M A N C E

-          E X C E L L E N T   L A N D I N G   P E R F O R M A N C E

-          E N G I N E   F A I L U R E S   C A N   E A S I L Y   B E   H A N D L E D

-          D I T C H I N G   I S   F L A W L E S S

T O   BE   R E V I S E D

-          L A N D I N G   G E A R   D A M P E R S   W E A K

-          E N G I N E   F A I L U R E   D U R I N G   R O T A T I O N   A T   5 0 m / s   I S   D E A D L Y   W I T H   F L A P S   O U T

-          T A I L   S T R I K E   P R E V E N T I O N   C A N   S T I L L   A L L O W   A P U   D A M AG E   O N   R O U G H   L A N D I N G S

-          R E V E R S E   T H R U S T   P R O D U C E S   A D D I T I O N A L   L I F T   D U E   T O   E N G I N E   R O T A T I O N   - - >   C H E C K   W I T H   C O L L I D E – O – S C O P E   M O D

-          F L A P S   C R E A T E   E X C E S S I V E   D R A G   O N   T A K E O F F

-          C R U I S E   F L I G H T   R E Q U I R E S   D O W N   P I T C H   I N P U T

-          T H E   P A S S E N G E R   V E R S I O N   H A S   A   V I S I B L E   C R A C K   I N   T H E   T A I L

 

- - - - -  V E R D I C T  - - - - -

T H E   P L A N E   O F F E R S   G O O D   C O M F O R T   W I T H   E X C E L L E N T    R A N G E   I N   A   R E L I A B L E   A N D   E A S Y   T O   M A I N T A I N   A I R F R A M E .

I T ’ S   R E L A T I V E L Y   C H E A P   A N D   P E R F O R M S   W E L L   I N   A L M O S T   A L L   F L I G H T   A N D   E M E R G E N C Y   S I T U A T I O N S .   I T ’ S   S L E E K   D E S I G N   W I L L   A L S O   S E R V E   W E L L   T O   A T T R A C T   P A S S E N G E R S .   T H E   F R E I G T E R   V E R S I O N   P E R F O R M E D   W E L L   T O O   A  N D   H A S   T H E   A D D E D   B E N E F I T   O F   R E Q U I R I N G   A L M O S T    N O   E X T R A   P I L O T   T R A I N I N G   T O   F L Y   B O T H .

W E ’ L L  O R D E R   T W O   P R E – P R O D U C T I O N   A I R C R A F T ,   W H E N   A L L   K I N K S   A R E   I R O N E D   O U T   A   L A R G E R   C O N T R A C T   S H O U L D   B E   C O N S I D E R E D .  


 

Edited by HB Stratos
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JORG Duck - Cargo Jet - $34,332,000

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Craft file: https://kerbalx.com/keptin/JORG-DUCK

Cruising Altitude: 20,000m

Cruising Speed: 1160m/s

Range: 5450km

Cargo Capacity: 1/2 bay + ramp

Perhaps one of the more practical aircraft by JORG is the Duck, a multi-role light utility and cargo craft. Designed to rapidly redeploy cargo and small vehicles throughout the reaches of Kerbin. Its supersonic flight allows it to traverse extreme reaches of territory, and with its heavy landing gear, can land just about anywhere, even with a full fuel and cargo load. While not particularly fast at low altitudes, its control systems afford masterful stability and authority over the aircraft. At a mere $34M, it's affordable for private airlines, small logistics operations, and scientific use. Contact your JORG representative to learn more.

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A new development from Antech Industries, a Dual Purpose Cargo Aircraft, the Antech J.220!

Cost: $64,992,000
Cruising Speed: 150 m/s
Cruising altitude: 5000 m
Range: 1,584 km

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Looking for versatility in a moderately priced and reliable jet aircraft? Look no further than the Antech J.220! the J,220 may not be the fastest option, nor is it the most comfortable, but it is undeniably capable in a multitude of roles!
Powered by 3 reliable and well known J-33 wheesley engines, technicians should have no problem finding replacement parts in the event of a breakdown. Strengthened inner wing spars make for easy access to the fuselage engines, no scaffolding required, just a ladder to get up there. Wide placement of the landing gear and a 2 kerbal cockpit make the plane much easier to land in one piece, making the J.220 an excellent plane for training new pilots.

The cabin area is the main feature of the aircraft, and can be easily configured in a passenger or cargo stowage mode. each seat folds individually, allowing you to efficiently combine small but necessary cargo shipments with unpopular passenger routes!

The J.220 also comes equipped with a folding cargo lift, located towards the aft of the cabin area. no more pesky loading using mobile conveyors and lifting equipment, simply plop your luggage onto the lift, and watch it gracefully ascend into the belly of the plane. Passengers may also board using this method, though it is recommended that they be assisted by ground crew. [damage to hydraulic equipment caused by loose fingers is NOT covered by your Antech warranty.]

Add an all-rounder to your fleet for a well rounded price today!
https://kerbalx.com/antimatterkill/Antech-Industries-J220

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Model 308

'Altoliner'

 

The second Minmus Drive yard engineers got wind of these new airliner requirements from Trans-Kerbin Airways, they knew from the beginning what they were going to attempt. Despite this, they had no delusions of the difficulties that were to come in submitting a piston engine design to compete against turbofan and turboprop airliners. Our company enlisted the help of Kerlington aircraft during the early design of the aircraft for help in structures and propulsion. The the final result is the fastest and most efficient radial aircraft ever built by either of the companies. Without further ado, our regional 'jet' submission, the mighty Kerlington-Minmus Model 308 'Altoliner'!

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The Altoliner is the peak of piston engine aviation. This airplane was originally derived from a Kerlington C3K military transport, but has had major structural, wing, tail, and most importantly, engine upgrades. The Altoliner is the final word in piston engine planes in terms of comfort, performance, and reliability. To demonstrate just how optimized this aircraft has been, note that it has a range of twice what the C3K has, and a top speed that is also almost double that of its predecessor.

Specifications:

- Cruise speed: ~199 m/s or more

- Cruise altitude: ~3000 m

- Cost: $82,682,170 (Purchase here)

- Capacity: 38 passengers + 2 pilots + 2 flight attendants

- Service ceiling: At least 5000 m

- Calculated range: ~1094 km

Impressive flight specs aren't all the Model 308 has to offer. The aircraft was designed with low density, medium distance routes in mind. This is the reason behind the relatively small number of seats in an otherwise large fuselage. As a bonus, this means that the seats themselves can be made significantly larger and more comfortable for the passengers. Vibrations from the large engines, while still significant, have been reduced slightly compared to the predecessor C3K due to a sturdier wing structure. The new 'J&R Excalibur' powerplants have shown to be reliable and difficult to unintentionally damage through over torquing. Furthermore, extensive flight testing has demonstrated that the airplane is stable and stalls are relatively difficult to enter, and easy to recover from. The tail of the aircraft has also been completely redone with greater care for aerodynamics and structural integrity, which is the reason for the struts on the triple tail. Another important feature that demonstrates a respect for the tight schedules of civilian aviation is the ability of the Altoliner to climb to over twice it's cruise altitude. While the range and speed are significantly decreased at such altitudes, it allows for the 308 to fly over most bad weather without needing to make a costly diversion. One crucial cost saving factor is ease of maintenance and reliability. While the Altoliner has generally good reliability, the complex nose landing gear strut is maintenance heavy. While on the topic of maintenance, the aircraft's tall appearance may make it seem that maintenance on the engines or tail is difficult, however this is not the case. A standard scissor lift platform is capable of reaching the highest point of the Altoliner's tail. Further, the triple tail allows for the 308 to fit in hangars for medium sized aircraft and hangars with a lower ceiling.

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Aside from these features, the Model 308 was built with love and care from its engineers and was built to look as appealing to passengers as possible, the aircraft is intended to illicit memories of the golden age of aviation in everyone who looks at it. That's about all there is to say about our Model 308 Altoliner. For specific flight information and standard operating procedures, refer here. All of us at Mimnus Drive Yards and Kerlington hope our new airplane finds a place in the fleet of Trans-Kerbin Airways.

Signed,

Barfrid Kerman

President, Minmus Drive Yards

Edited by mrdanger2007
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Test Pilot Review: @Klapaucius's Squire Submarine Plane by K.R.A.S.S.H

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The submarine plane working in its secondary purpose - submarining!

Figures as Tested:

  • Price: :funds:44,654,000
  • Fuel: 1272 units
  • Cruising speed: 1300m/s (top speed) 940m/s (economical cruise)
  • Cruising altitude: 18km
  • Fuel burn rate: 0.42 - 0.72 (economic cruise)
  • Range:  2223km (economic cruise)

Review Notes:

APOLOGIES FOR LATE REVIEW!

This aircraft is truly an oddity.

It resembles a pod racer more than a plane and according to K.R.A.S.S.H, the plane should be capable of supersonic flight, water landings and, submarine capability. That's a lot of stuff for one plane to do and, as a result, our test pilots were eager to test.

The aircraft featured a myriad of design oddities like double canards, an extremely forward swept main wing and dual cockpit. For a supersonic aircraft, the aircraft also lacked airbrakes - though we suspect this would be fixed in production models. Design oddities aside, the aircraft looked functional enough to test so it was taxied onto the runway. The odd gear configuration resembled a cross between tricycle and taildragger landing gear though was surprisingly easy to taxi. 

The aircraft was cleared for takeoff and the four engines rapidly accelerated the aircraft. The aircraft's power-to-weight ratio allowed for a short takeoff despite high speeds required due to the landing gear configuration. The aircraft reached cruise altitude easily and achieved the advertised top speed of 1300m/s. Interestingly, at high altitudes, the front two engines shut off, leaving only the rear two engines for cruising. TKA was not given an instruction handbook on how to reach optimum cruise, so our test pilots made up one. At half throttle at 18km, the aircraft had a burn rate of 0.42 - 0.72 units/sec and a cruise speed of 940m/s. Range was estimated at 2223km. The aircraft handled surprisingly well and had fairly decent low speed handling. Landing both on land and in water proved a breeze. Takeoff was just as easy with the high thrust-to-weight ratio. One slight complaint was the slight instability in handling when rolling at low speed. The submarine capability was also a success utilising the afterburners of the front two engines. We're not really sure where this would come in handy, but it's nice to have at least. The aircraft is well prepared in emergencies with water landing capability and multiple engines. Afterburner was useful for compensating the loss of engines. 

Maintenance-wise, the aeroplane is a tad problematic. With two different types of engines and four engines in total on a relatively small plane, the aircraft is costly to maintain. That, combined with the engines ingesting water due to where they're located means even more maintenance is required. Passenger capacity is also a fairly lacking at 16 passengers, though, the extra cockpits could be repurposed to fit more passengers.

Overall, the aircraft is relatively cheap to buy and comes with very few inherent flaws with maintenance and a lack of airbrakes being the only concerns.

The Verdict:

The aircraft is cheap, easy to fly and fast. In its current state, TKA will order 11 for use in undeveloped areas where only ocean or lake landings are possible. If maintenance costs and passengers are reduced, TKA will consider buying another 6.

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Test Pilot Review: [@antimatterkill's Antech J.220]

A comic sans review was requested. Ask and you shall receive. 

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(Pictured: The J.220 in flight over the ocean)

[No Payload] Figures as Tested:

  • Price::funds:65,160,000

  • Fuel: 3380 kal

  • Cruising speed: 145 m/s

  • Cruising altitude: 5000 m

  • Fuel burn rate: 0.32 kal/s

  • Range: ~ 1500 km

[9t Payload] Figures as Tested:

  • Price::funds:65,160,000 + Payload Cost

  • Fuel: 3380 kal

  • Cruising speed: 130 m/s

  • Cruising altitude: 3000 m

  • Fuel burn rate: 0.41 kal/s

  • Range: ~ 1100 km

Review Notes:

The J.220 is a pretty unique plane. You could call it a double decker, having a cargo bay on the lower deck and an interchangeable passenger/cargo area up top. Its two side engines are also in an interesting position, angled away from the centreline. While interesting, we fear that this design might cause the engines to lose some effectiveness in its thrust. The intakes and engines also run along the space at the side between the two decks. Consequently, the passengers at the rear may experience some discomfort due to the engines being relatively close to the cabin.

We took a look at the cargo bay lift, and we must say we're quite impressed with it. We tested its capabilities with a 9 ton payload and it performed admirably. It would also greatly reduce the reliance on ground crews to load the cargo, or for passengers to board it at lesser-equipped airports. However, we feel that the size of the cargo hold needs to be expanded, if possible, as it is currently quite small.

Regarding its takeoff performance, we must say that the takeoff distance needed was a tad higher than expected at 700m, Vr 60m/s without payload and 1000m, Vr 70m/s with the 9 ton payload. For a plane of its size, we really were hoping for a shorter run.

Its pitch, yaw and roll are all superb. Regarding the ailerons, we are slightly concerned that excessive loads on it could break it off its mounting servo. We suggest adding a 'restrainer' hinge at the aileron tip just to give it that extra rigidity.

However, we noticed in the climbing phase that the plane suffers from a high AoA even at higher speeds. We figure that this is due to the plane's relatively high wing loading. Because of this, climb performance is a bit under our expectations. Also, this results in a relatively high stall speed of around 50m/s. This also made it quite difficult to maintain cruising speed at the designated cruise altitude, as the high AoA needed to keep the plane at 5000m caused a decent amount of drag. Because of this, the plane was only able to reach 145m/s (without payload), and even so, with great difficulty.

Apropos to its landing performance, while it is able to land at relatively low speeds, the weak brakes and lack of thrust reversers greatly hampered its landing roll. The flaps also did not assist much with lift, and in fact contributed to excessive drag. Without a payload, the plane had a VTD of 55 m/s and a 800m landing roll. With the 9 ton payload, VTD was 60m/s and the plane had a 1300m landing roll. These numbers are quite high for a plane of its size, and we highly suggest that Antech incorporates more powerful brakes and install thrust reversers on the engines to improve landing distance.

We also simulated potential emergency situations. We found that the plane, while capable of taking off with one engine, is neither able to climb out with said one engine nor fly level. The aforementioned high wing loading also results in subpar glide performance. That being said, the plane performed admirably in water ditching. The fuselage shape looks a tad like a ship's hull, and we figure that this helped it successfully ditch.

The Verdict:

It's a nice combi plane. Its integrated cargo lift opens up possibilities to less-developed airports for both passenger and cargo routes. It is also decently comfortable for the 32 passengers, save for the few at the rear.

However, it has a relatively small cargo bay and as a result, it would be difficult to transport a large amount of cargo. Maintenance wise, it's an alright plane to keep flying. Some components are a tad high up, and the cargo lift has to be regularly checked.

Also, the long landing distance needed reduces the number of airports we can fly to.

Perhaps the most pressing issue is its high wing loading. As a result of this, its flight characteristics are greatly affected as listed above and are frankly suboptimal. We implore that you fix this issue before production.

If the unfavourable aspects of this plane are resolved, TKA will consider buying 5, as the multitasking capability of the plane could be quite useful.

 

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Juhnu Aerospace JA-42

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Juhnu Aerospace introduces its brand new turboprop airliner, the JA-42! Previously experienced with fighter jets, a turboprop airliner is something new to Juhnu Aerospace. The result is a capable and sleek looking plane, surely catching the eyes of your customers. Powered by two highly efficient, silent and powerful Juhnu Motors JM127 turboprops, it can reach a speed of 165m/s at its cruising altitude of 4,5km and gets a range of over 2100km. Its custom made cabin ensures the maximum of 34 passengers a pleasant flight. It can also land and take off from some shorter runways. With a takeoff and stall speed of around 70m/s, it has a takeoff distance of under 800m. In an emergency, the plane has some decent gliding abilities and can stay up for a long time with only one engine. Water landings should be also easy to perform. The plane can be obtained from here for :funds:152,131,000.

Flight manual

-Activate engines from RCS

-Trim the prop pitch from throttle

-Flaps can be set to two different angles from AG1 & 2

At takeoff:

-Activate engines and raise throttle up to 1/3

-Once speeding up, start raising throttle up to 2/3

After takeoff:

-Raise landing gear

-Start slowly throttling up to 100%

-Once you reach the speed of around 140-150m/s, start pitching to 15 degrees level out at 4000-4500m

At landing:

-Lower landing gear

-Keep speed over 70m/s until landing

-Touch down slowly, put throttle to 0% and activate brakes

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Hi everyone, myself and a few other judges have decided to change up how aircraft are categorised as we felt the current system is a little restrictive.

Instead of having set categories for each kind of plane, there are now two different categories for both size and range that you can select. The only categories left unchanged are the Cargo/Combi category and Flying Boat category. This change was done as in real life, not every long range aircraft is a large aircraft and vice versa. 

If you have built an aircraft to the old requirements and it has not been judged yet, the judges will match the aircraft to the closest range and passenger capacity requirement according to the new system.

The revised categories are in the spoiler below:

Spoiler

Range Requirements:

Short-Haul Airliner

  • A cruising speed of 110m/s or greater is preferred
  • Must have a range of 1000km
  • Short takeoff and landing is preferred. Must be capable of operating on rough airfields.

Medium-Haul Airliner

  • Cruising speed of 230m/s or greater is preferred
  • Must have a range of 2000km - 3000km
  • Should be equipped to operate at smaller airports.

Long-Haul Airliner

  • Cruising Speed of 240m/s or greater is preferred
  • Must have a range greater than 3000km

Passenger Capacity Requirements:

Low Capacity

  • Maximum 100 passengers

Medium Capacity

  • Must carry 100 - 300 passengers
  • Standard or greater comfort is preferred

High Capacity

  • Must carry more than 300 passengers
  • Must have high levels of passenger comfort

SPECIAL CATEGORIES:

These categories do not correspond with the ones above

Flying Boat

  • Must be capable of taking off and landing from water
  • Range of at least 500km
  • Cruising Speed of at least 100m/s
  • Can be of any size

Cargo/Combi Aircraft

  • Must carry cargo.
  • Range of at least 1500km
  • Combi aircraft must carry both passengers and cargo

Happy building, and any suggestions to this new system will be considered :)

Edited by HolidayTheLeek
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36 minutes ago, HolidayTheLeek said:

Hi everyone, myself and a few other judges have decided to change up how aircraft are categorised as we felt the current system is a little restrictive.

Instead of having set categories for each kind of plane, there are now two different categories for both size and range that you can select. The only categories left unchanged are the Cargo/Combi category and Flying Boat category. This change was done as in real life, not every long range aircraft is a large aircraft and vice versa. 

If you have built an aircraft to the old requirements and it has not been judged yet, the judges will match the aircraft to the closest range and passenger capacity requirement according to the new system.

The revised categories are in the spoiler below:

  Hide contents

Range Requirements:

Short-Haul Airliner

  • A cruising speed of 110m/s or greater is preferred
  • Must have a range of 1000km
  • Short takeoff and landing is preferred. Must be capable of operating on rough airfields.

Medium-Haul Airliner

  • Cruising speed of 230m/s or greater is preferred
  • Must have a range of 2000km - 3000km
  • Should be equipped to operate at smaller airports.

Long-Haul Airliner

  • Cruising Speed of 240m/s or greater is preferred
  • Must have a range greater than 3000km

Passenger Capacity Requirements:

Low Capacity

  • Maximum 100 passengers

Medium Capacity

  • Must carry 100 - 300 passengers
  • Standard or greater comfort is preferred

High Capacity

  • Must carry more than 300 passengers
  • Must have high levels of passenger comfort

SPECIAL CATEGORIES:

These categories do not correspond with the ones above

Flying Boat

  • Must be capable of taking off and landing from water
  • Range of at least 500km
  • Cruising Speed of at least 100m/s
  • Can be of any size

Cargo/Combi Aircraft

  • Must carry cargo.
  • Range of at least 1500km
  • Combi aircraft must carry both passengers and cargo

Happy building, and any suggestions to this new system will be considered :)

Great ideas. Do you have a policy on multiple submissions?  I've got a few others, but I don't want to be a hog either... I just enjoy promoting aerial weirdness :)

It would be neat at the end or at various times to see screenshots of your growing hangar with the various planes together.

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29 minutes ago, Klapaucius said:

Great ideas. Do you have a policy on multiple submissions?  I've got a few others, but I don't want to be a hog either... I just enjoy promoting aerial weirdness :)

It would be neat at the end or at various times to see screenshots of your growing hangar with the various planes together.

Multiple submissions are okay as long as they're not just haphazardly made and not spammy. Submit as much as you want - just don't expect them to be reviewed instantly as a result.

As for the hangar screenshots that's actually a good idea. It might be done as an end of month thing for the best aircraft we got submitted :)

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Test Pilot Review: [@Juhnu's JA-42] Short Haul, Low Capacity Turboprop

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(Pictured: The JA-42 flying over the ocean)

Figures as Tested:

  • Price::funds:152,132,000
  • Fuel: 180 kal
  • Cruising speed: 165 m/s
  • Cruising altitude: 5000 m
  • Fuel burn rate: 0.02 kal/s
  • Range: ~1500 km

Review Notes:

On first impressions, this is an absolutely beautiful aircraft. Its looks are better than most of the airliners we have received. Our PR department jumped in joy when they looked at it, as it meant that they would be able to conjure up an attractive promotional advertisement for TKA.

Our maintenance team were also pretty impressed with the plane. They noted that it wasn't very complex to keep running, which is fantastic.

Perhaps most striking was the custom cabin. While it was on the smaller side, it means that TKA is able to customise the cabin to suit our needs, such as making it more comfortable.

Regarding its takeoff performance, we were a bit surprised when it accelerated so quickly. The plane was able to takeoff in 800m, Vr 75m/s, pretty decent albeit a tad long for a plane of its size. That being said, it's a joy to fly. It has pretty good control authority in all 3 axes, although a stronger pitch-up would be preferred. It has a good climb rate and is incredible at maintaining speed.

A little quirk we noticed was that the plane would yaw slightly when the throttles moved. However, this is no big deal, and the plane will right itself after a short while.

Also, putting the throttles in idle gave the engines a 'thrust reversal' feeling. While this might catch trainee pilots off guard, it's not difficult to correct them. Plus, this could allow for steeper descents into airports.

Apropos to landing, we noticed on full flaps that the pitch authority, specifically pitching up, of the plane was not as strong. In fact, the plane needed to maintain a speed of 85m/s at full flaps to be able to pitch up. With no flaps however, the plane managed a VTD of 70m/s and a landing roll of 500m. This can be made shorter by not braking the propellers and leaving them to spin, taking advantage of the aforementioned thrust reverser feeling.

With regards to emergency simulations, it performed admirably. The plane was very easy to ditch in the water, and it was able to takeoff and climb on one engine. It is also a good glider, although the prop pitch needs to be managed closely so that the free-spinning props don't contribute to too much deceleration.

In a bid to improve pitch-up authority and general performance, a minor change we highly recommend you add is a 3-5 degree trim to the horizontal stabilisers. We found that this small change contributed to a takeoff distance of 500m and Vr 60m/s (300m and 15m/s lesser), and a landing speed VTD of 65m/s, 400m landing roll (5m/s, 100m lesser).

The Verdict:

It's an absolutely incredible plane. The custom cabin is unlike what we have seen in the lineup, and this gives us freedom to customise our cabins better for our passengers. It has decent range and capacity for the amount of fuel it carries. While it is a tad expensive, we think its beauty, advertisement potential and customisable cabins more than make up the cost. Not to mention, the ease of maintenance will further lower the money spent on the aircraft. Our only suggestion is to implement the minor fix regarding the horizontal stabiliser's trim.

All in all, it's a fantastic aircraft, and TKA will be willing to purchase 10 + another potential 5 if the aircraft proves to be good for our routes.

 

 

 

Edited by Maxorin
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Test Pilot Review: @keptin's Valara Centurion (Medium-Haul, Low Capacity)

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Figures as Tested:

  • Price: :funds:32,334,000
  • Fuel: 1600 units
  • Cruising speed: 295m/s
  • Cruising altitude: 9500m
  • Fuel burn rate: 0.20 
  • Passengers Carried: 40
  • Range: 2212km

Review Notes:

After some positive reviews from our other test pilots, we were delighted to have a Valara aeroplane in hangar to test. 

The aircraft was fairly conventional aside from the extremely tall landing gear, the twin-fin setup and its usage of struts. Our engineers were unsure why the aircraft did not make use of newer autostrut technologies but this was deemed a non issue; just an oddity in its design. The aircraft carried 1200 units of fuel in the wings and a further 400 more in its engine nacelles. The tall landing gear could also prove somewhat problematic at some airports, though, we suspect this was a measure to keep engines safe from FOD (foreign object damage). One particular area of concern was the engine placement, which were situated very close to the passenger cabins. The wing-mounted engines were not situated under the wing but instead, in the centre. This meant the engine exhaust was fairly close to the passenger cabins, raising some noise concerns. The rearmost engine was attached directly to the passenger cabin at the back which could be another potential source of noise. Minor comfort problems aside, the aircraft looked good from the pilots' point of view being easy to taxi and having ample power with its tri-jet configuration on a relatively small and light airframe. While three engines on a type this small could pose some maintenance issues, the engines were simple enough (J-33 Wheesleys) and weren't in particularly challenging locations.

Our test pilot Valentina was given the aircraft to test after pre-flight checks were complete. 

The aircraft accelerated well on the runway and had a relatively low takeoff speed at around 55m/s. Climb was extremely good with the aircraft reaching the target altitude (9500m) in only three minutes. The aircraft only required minor trim to fly straight and maintain altitude. A low fuel burn rate was maintained at 0.20 kal/s. The aircraft was calculated to have an impressive 2212km of range -  an amazing feat considering the fuel load of only 1600 units. The Centurion's big, thick wings gave the aircraft low wing loading which, reduced stall speeds, decreased turn radius and put less Gs on the passengers. Unfortunately, that's where the passenger comfort ends. Whilst passengers situated in cabins fore of the engines had a relatively smooth ride - passengers aft of the engines experienced the unending racket of three fully throttled jets right next to their cabins (Valentina was instructed to fly the aircraft at full throttle even during cruise). The aircraft landed well with flaps and airbrakes deployed on the landing gear action group. Combined with the reverse thrust action group set to 'brakes', the aircraft could land on extremely short airfields. The aircraft could also perform on unpaved runways due to the large landing gear keeping engines away from ingesting debris on the ground. 

The Centurion was also very easily flown with a single engine (from anywhere on the aircraft) and could still maintain fully controlled flight making it very safe in the event of an engine failure. The big wings also proved useful as flotation devices in the event of an emergency water landing.

Overall, the aircraft works well in its intended purpose as a medium range, low capacity airliner. Aside from some passenger comfort issues in the rear cabins, the aircraft is cheap to buy at only 33 million and has low estimated maintenance costs. 

The Verdict:

The Centurion is a very effective aircraft for its role and price of only 33 million. You get a lot of bang for your buck considering the low cost -  the Centurion has all the bells and whistles of any other aircraft, too. Despite low passenger comfort in the rear cabins, the aircraft's superb performance and cost override these smaller issues.

TKA will consider buying 15 of them for use in its longer regional routes. 

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Test Pilot Review : @Maxorin’s SubPar Industries S350 (long-haul airliner)

 

 

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Figures as tested :

 

- Price ::funds:570 940 000

- Fuel : 12 250 units

- Cruising speed : 190 m/s

- Cruising altitude : 8100 m

- Fuel burn rate : 0.75 units/s

- Passengers carried : 240 passengers

- Range : 3000 km

 

Review notes :

 

The test pilot team was delighted to encounter such a polished aircraft, remarking in the process the clear out-of-the-factory appearance and quality of the build. All expressed appreciation for the attention to detail and an overall harmonious shape. In particular, the front view of the wing received abundant acclaim. Many amongst the crew were glad to finally face controls they knew and were familiar with, along with the functionalities that are of common use in the business.

 

As soon as our first pilot began accelerating the aircraft on the runway, he was thankful towards the engineering team which had been sufficiently generous towards provided thrust for take-off to be quick and easy. Well-positioned landing gear allowed for rotation at speeds as low as 25 m/s, followed by lift-off at 45 m/s. This allowed for take-off distances of under 400 metres, which pleasantly opened up the idea of visiting smaller airports with accordingly shorter runways. The ground crew was astonished by the main landing gear’s uncommon folding mechanism, which gave to some the impression the aircraft was leaping into the air in a most elegant manner. Thereafter, good climbing performance, with a pitch angle of up to 30° for 80 m/s vertical velocity, was ensured by the pair of turbofans sitting at a comfortable distance above ground. It was hypothesised that without passengers to complain about the uncomfortable angling of such a manoeuvre, pilots could manage to extract even higher performance to soar into the heavens.

However during this phase of flight it was becoming more apparent the aircraft had a tendency to roll as it pitched up. Following initial testing, this was reported to the rest of the team, which subsequently unlocked the horizontal stabiliser’s ability to control roll. A slight tendency to nose up was also noted at first, but this was corrected by the mechanics via trimming.

It was noted the aircraft’s behaviour was very consistent between low and high speeds, which was greatly appreciated by the test pilots, who could relax instead of needing to constantly adjust. High-speed testing was also carried out, reaching 225 m/s in horizontal flight at altitude without any effort, and later approaching supersonic speeds during a 45° dive at full throttle (yes this is totally a standard operation in the field) barely overpassing 320 m/s without any structural issues on the horizon. It thereafter handled a 3g recovery excellently, continuing its journey as if nothing were.

 

Multiple cases of failure where tested for. Courageous pilots attempted landing immediately after take-off, and succeeded to do so before reaching the end of the runway, completing the manoeuvre in 1600 m. The aircraft was also tested in the case of a water landing, again just after lift-off. Even at this early stage of flight, the emergency procedure functioned, and a full stop was reached shortly after touching the surface, resulting in a consistent deceleration of 4.6g. Good floatability was achieved, leaving the wings above the surface so to allow passengers to exit the cabin in relative comfort and safety. It was also appreciated that emergency exits had been fitted above the main wing for a more efficient evacuation.

Engine failure was also considered, and the test pilots managed to maintain speed and attitude with a single engine at cruising height, although with full yaw and constant pitch & roll corrections being necessary. The crew also measured satisfactory gliding performance during this procedure.

 

Several extreme situations were also thought of by the more imaginative amongst the testing team, and according manoeuvres were performed when possible. First of which sought to determine if water take-off was possible after crash landing in the ocean. After very fine piloting with minute and rapid corrections, the aeroplane lifted off out of the water, undamaged apart from a bit of salt that coated the turbines. The simulation team was given the task of calculating if the aircraft was capable of performing a loop-the-loop at take-off and if it could fly without the main wing. It promptly responded that this was indeed impossible as imagined by the vast majority of the crew, although a few resilient members insisted that they could “easily pull it off”, but authorisations were not accorded. Inverted flying was also tested, but the aircraft could not maintain attitude, nosing down even with full pitch commands.

 

The final verdict :

 

Although all amongst the testing team were delighted by the aircraft, the directing board was somewhat worried by the expenses of such a craft. Understandably, 570 million funds is far from insignificant pricing, and therefore purchase must be thought through with great care. Engineers and mechanics reported that due to the presence of simply two well-known engines and their conventional layout as well as low ground-sitting would allow the company not to ruin itself on maintenance costs. The marketing team also concluded that such an aircraft would improve the company's view from the public, opening the possibility to develop the long-haul sector even more. The board therefore decided on purchasing two S350s, while making the likeliness of later orders clear if predicted success was observed once in operation.

 

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Rutnamlines is proud to offer our A917-A Skycutter as a part of Trans-Kerbin Airways' fleet!

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The A917a: A short haul, low capacity airliner with long range capabilities. Rutnamlines hopes to hit the airliner scene by storm with its revolutionary new turboprop, the Skycutter. With an impressive takeoff run of only 400 meters and an optimal cruising speed of 150 m/s at 7000 meters, the Skycutter provides luxury comfort as well as sport like performance. The Skycutter carries passengers far with a range of 3,500 kilometres, comfortably and quietly thanks to its two twin prop, contra rotating propeller engines. 

The A917a is equipped with with special variable pitch propeller blades.

Before flying, activate action groups 1 and 2 to set takeoff propeller pitch and enable the aircraft's online energy generation devices.

After reaching 90m/s and 110m/s, activate action group 3 then 4, respectivley.

Fly Safe- This aircraft is available for purchase here at kerbalX for $192,000,000. https://kerbalx.com/jceverett/rutnamlines-A917-A-Skycutter

Edited by rutnam
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