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Rogue Planets and Sub-Surface Oceans


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Hi,

I recently learned that red dwarf stars pass through our solar system quite regularly and it got me thinking, what if gravity distortion flung Earth out into deep space? 

If it happened in the near future, we might see a race to send as many people as possible towards Mars before Earth froze over, with survivors continuing to eek out an existence underwater near thermal vents. Increasingly advanced engines could be used to continue travel between Earth and Mars, even as the former drifts ever deeper into the black void.

So this presents a couple scenarios that would be really interesting to see in KSP2: 

1) Rouge planets in interstellar space, who knows how many there could be and what their size / characteristics are. 

2) Sub-surface oceans on said rogue planets, and especially on gas giant moons and Kuiper belt object analogues (I can imagine such things are hard to program but KSP2 is aiming big so why not).

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7 minutes ago, linuxgurugamer said:

Really?  Define "regularly"

I was surprised to learn it happened "only" 17,000 years ago at a "mere" distance of 52,000 AU. That would have been a sight to see.

15 minutes ago, Nirgal said:

Hi,

I recently learned that red dwarf stars pass through our solar system quite regularly and it got me thinking, what if gravity distortion flung Earth out into deep space? 

If it happened in the near future, we might see a race to send as many people as possible towards Mars before Earth froze over, with survivors continuing to eek out an existence underwater near thermal vents. Increasingly advanced engines could be used to continue travel between Earth and Mars, even as the former drifts ever deeper into the black void.

So this presents a couple scenarios that would be really interesting to see in KSP2: 

1) Rouge planets in interstellar space, who knows how many there could be and what their size / characteristics are. 

2) Sub-surface oceans on said rogue planets, and especially on gas giant moons and Kuiper belt object analogues (I can imagine such things are hard to program but KSP2 is aiming big so why not).

Probably won't happen in KSP-2. Doesn't happen nearly often enough.

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  • 1 month later...
On 7/14/2021 at 7:17 AM, Linky said:

I was surprised to learn it happened "only" 17,000 years ago at a "mere" distance of 52,000 AU. That would have been a sight to see.

is a second in astromical timelines

Edited by ffx
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On 7/14/2021 at 1:17 AM, Linky said:

I was surprised to learn it happened "only" 17,000 years ago at a "mere" distance of 52,000 AU. That would have been a sight to see.

Probably won't happen in KSP-2. Doesn't happen nearly often enough.

Correction:

Scholz’s star passed within a light-year of the Solar System, 70 or 80 thousand years ago, about 55,000 astronomical units from our Sun (5.1 trillion miles).

The Scholz’s star would have been 100 times too dim to be seen with the naked eye.

more: https://exoplanets.nasa.gov/blog/1549/a-passing-star-our-suns-near-miss/

 

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