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Frame rates and human perception


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People generally don't understand how their own vision works, because our brain tricks us.

We actually have a very small field of view that has sharp focus, and everything else that we think we see is a mental model based on what we last saw, the expectation of object permanence, and hazy and unfocused peripheral vision.

Also, the retina can only react to changes much slower than the brain can, so we do things like build a mental model of a ball in flight rather than really watch a ball in flight (which is why the curveball works).

Edited by mikegarrison
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5 minutes ago, Master39 said:

That may be very well the reason, and even if you did it depends also on how fast you're used to move in games.

I mean idk how much faster would it feel to you but I think these are even faster...

Spoiler

 

idk, maybe if someone have seen it in front of themselves vs. whatever extra-high-fps thing one can have could be compared.

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This subject has been done to death on a lot of different flightsim and gaming forums.   I suspect that a lot of hardcore gamers will never be satisfied with a framerate less than infinity.

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18 hours ago, mikegarrison said:

People generally don't understand how their own vision works, because our brain tricks us.

We actually have a very small field of view that has sharp focus, and everything else that we think we see is a mental model based on what we last saw, the expectation of object permanence, and hazy and unfocused peripheral vision.

Also, the retina can only react to changes much slower than the brain can, so we do things like build a mental model of a ball in flight rather than really watch a ball in flight (which is why the curveball works).

This is correct, games however does not know there you are looking so it has to render all of the screen to max resolution. 
You could technically track the eyes and only render the part you look at in max resolution but this would require some insane frame rates to work as the eyes can move very fast. 

The benefit of the ultra wide gaming monitors is that they give you an much better field of view who is horrible on an standard monitor. 

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2 minutes ago, magnemoe said:

The benefit of the ultra wide gaming monitors is that they give you an much better field of view who is horrible on an standard monitor. 

Spoiler

GUEST_aa5439c2-acf5-46d2-80a9-4d2caffecd

 

A natural limit.

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1 hour ago, kerbiloid said:
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GUEST_aa5439c2-acf5-46d2-80a9-4d2caffecd

 

A natural limit.

glasses has an larger field of view than monitors unless you have an 50" one , you can also see past the edge of the glasses. Its also the issue that your internal field of view tend to be narrower than it would be if the screen was an window. 

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1 minute ago, magnemoe said:

glasses has an larger field of view than monitors unless you have an 50" one

When you are sitting straight, keeping eyes horizontally, and the glasses field of view is enough high.

Exactly at this moment I am an example of the opposite.

So, they will equip the wide monitors with gamer glasses with hemispherical lenses and red/green visors on top.

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19 hours ago, benzman said:

This subject has been done to death on a lot of different flightsim and gaming forums.   I suspect that a lot of hardcore gamers will never be satisfied with a framerate less than infinity.

Which is why I often say that gamers are the new audiophiles.

20 hours ago, mikegarrison said:

People generally don't understand how their own vision works, because our brain tricks us.

We actually have a very small field of view that has sharp focus, and everything else that we think we see is a mental model based on what we last saw, the expectation of object permanence, and hazy and unfocused peripheral vision.

Also, the retina can only react to changes much slower than the brain can, so we do things like build a mental model of a ball in flight rather than really watch a ball in flight (which is why the curveball works).

There are at least some attempts to exploit this in VR: simply throwing more pixels at the problem (the traditional GPU method) would require something like 32,000x32,000 resolution to match the human retina.  But if you know where the retina is pointed (much easier in VR), you can ignore nearly all of them and concentrate within 15 degrees or so of the user's view (and presumably appear the same using only current GPUs).  Unfortunately, of the two companies that appear interested.  One is Fove and is going nowhere, the other is Facebook/Occulus who obviously wants to track and record everything you look at.

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