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LUCY


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16 hours ago, Mr.dobsonian said:

There have been other missions where certain components haven't worked properly and yet still turned out successful so I'm sure if it doesn't latch that it'll still work

From memory, Skylab had one solar panel tear off, and the other had to be manually fixed in a spacewalk (luckily, Skylab was designed to be docked to.  That was kind of the whole idea).

Most of the others require harsh work arounds, and typically extend the useful life after most of the primary mission is complete (see failing gyroscopes on most of NASA's telescopes).  Losing half your solar power will make trying to salvage anything out a mission difficult, and I hope they can at least get that.

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8 hours ago, FleshJeb said:

Tory Bruno giving a brief explanation of the RAAN steering that the rocket used for the mission:

 

Short, sweet, too the point and informative.

Seems better than what BO has been putting out. 

Looks like ULA is learning how to PR in the modern era!

 

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The Lucy mission is so ambitious, going to space as far as Jupiter orbit! Investigation of the Trojan asteroids is the precious data. With this mission we will be able to get precise data to work on, as the asteroids are one of the main parts of the Solar system, still having its hypotheses and mysteries.

Pioneering for the space always has huge potential. Special missions bring precious data. And what is great, that with smaller ones we go from breakthroughs to routines. While it took 60 years for satellites become a daily thing. It takes couple decades or less for landing asteroids to take it's steps forward to become a regular thing. More countries are following US and Japan. UAE is going for it. Combining the cooperative data from all the missions will make a huge leap for our understanding of the Solar system, hence safety and understanding of the future. It is not of big surprise, that other countries go after the leaders:

1. What leaders are doing is numerous tests and refinements until the process is ready to go.

2. Any big project involves many countries' cooperation for the effectiveness of testing and production. What is once a breakthrough becomes a routine sooner or later. Nowadays as soon as possible.

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2 hours ago, JoeSchmuckatelli said:

Short, sweet, too the point and informative.

Seems better than what BO has been putting out. 

Looks like ULA is learning how to PR in the modern era!

 

Tory Bruno has been running some classy PR on Twitter for years now. He hasn’t let himself be dragged into the alley with Muck and Bozos.

You can send anything reasonable to his Colorado office, and he’ll sign it and return it on his dime. I got a history of flight coffee table book signed by him for my son. 

ULA also sends out birthday swag if you give them or Tory  a shoutout on Twitter on your birthday. 

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On 10/19/2021 at 2:30 AM, Mr.dobsonian said:

other missions where certain components haven't worked properly and yet still turned out successful

Yes, exactly, just look at Galileo! That thing was basically one big malfunction!

Edited by Maria Sirona
Added context about Galileo
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A question regarding the orbit:

lucy is supposed to leave earth for an orbit, then come back for a gravity assist.

however, from what i know of gravity assists, your speed and energy compared to the planet remains constant. you can change your direction, but not your speed. gravity assists are useful when there are three bodies involved, because you can use one of them to gain or lose speed compared to the other.

But in this case? Probe leaves earth in direction X, at a certain speed. then it gets a gravity assist, and it leaves earth at the same speed, but in a different direction Y. couldn't they just launch the probe in direction Y the first time, at exactly the same cost?

Unless maybe it's because they launch with 28 degrees inclination, and this gravity assist allows removing inclination and going equatorial for free?

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32 minutes ago, king of nowhere said:

from what i know of gravity assists, your speed and energy compared to the planet remains constant

I don't think this is correct. The total speed and energy of the planet and the spaceship combined remains constant. But the spaceship can gain (or lose) speed or energy while simultaneously the planet loses (or gains) an equivalent amount.

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7 minutes ago, Kerwood Floyd said:

I don't think this is correct. The total speed and energy of the planet and the spaceship combined remains constant. But the spaceship can gain (or lose) speed or energy while simultaneously the planet loses (or gains) an equivalent amount.

the spaceship gains or loses energy compared to the star, and to other planets. it doesn't gain anything compared to the planet it's using for the current assist.

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OK, I think we were both right and just not understanding each other. What difference does it make whether LUCY gains speed relative to Earth? If it gains speed relative to the Sun doesn't that get it to (the vicinity of) Jupiter faster than otherwise?

 

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