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Games with atmosphere


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Hello everyone
I would like to tell you about such an idea, how to make a sufficiently high mountain or an area with a high altitude above sea level on some planet. In this area, the atmosphere ceases to act, but gravity acts, it would be rather unusual, as an analogue of Everest on earth (after all, there is almost no oxygen there), only much, much more. And accordingly, on the one hand, this would facilitate landing on the planet, and on the other hand, the kerbonauts would still have to experience the entry into the atmosphere, because a dense atmosphere begins immediately on the slope. I think this is quite unusual, what do you say?

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Quite an interesting idea! Would love to see planet or moon with this concept. Imagine atmosphere being only in lowlands or craters, and no atmosphere in hilly or mountainous areas. Maybe the atmosphere got blasted away by solar winds and it only remains in lower reaches of a planet/moon. One planet looked like it only had atmosphere in craters (I think it was Charr), so that gave me the idea of atmosphere only existing in lower parts of the planet/moon.

Spoiler

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Or it could just be water... But my gut tells me it's an atmosphere.

Edited by SonicMasterLB
grammar
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1 hour ago, jastrone said:

разве мы не видели луну в форме капли или что-то в этом роде? это будет действовать как очень большая гора. и разве это не будет похоже на планету или луну без атмосферы?

read carefully, it is said that it is necessary to make a mountain, peak or area of the planet, on which there will be no atmosphere, but on the rest of it there will be (atmosphere)

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12 hours ago, Kerbal wanderer said:

read carefully, it is said that it is necessary to make a mountain, peak or area of the planet, on which there will be no atmosphere, but on the rest of it there will be (atmosphere)

yhea that wouldnt really be that interesting

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I don’t think you understand how atmospheres work. Earth’s atmosphere extends up to around 100km above sea level (just the mesosphere- the troposphere extends some distance beyond that and is one reason why the ISS needs its orbit boosted every few months) and the tallest mountain isn’t even 9km above sea level. Mars, which has an atmosphere 0.6% as dense as Earth’s at its lowest point, still has a mesosphere up to about 100km and yet Olympus Mons, the biggest mountain in the solar system, reaching to a mere 25km.

To have mountains that extend beyond an atmosphere requires two contradictory conditions- tall mountains require low gravity (as higher gravity would pull them down and compress the core) but holding an atmosphere requires high gravity or the gases would escape. Look at the real life examples- Venus (almost Earth sized, no mountains getting remotely near the edge of the atmosphere), Earth (no mountains remotely near the edge of the atmosphere) Mars (losing its very thin atmosphere continuously to the solar wind, tallest mountain in the solar system and it still isn’t close to the edge of the atmosphere), the four gas giants (high gravity), Titan (a bit of an outlier with a thick atmosphere but low gravity, but still no mountains anywhere near the edge of the atmosphere) and that’s it really.

Anything big enough to have an appreciable atmosphere would be big enough that the mountains wouldn’t reach above it, and anything small enough to have a sufficiently irregular shape and/or tall enough mountains wouldn’t be able to gather and hold on to an atmosphere because its gravity would be far too weak. If the KSP2 team went to the trouble of making Minmus made of glass because they calculated that ice wouldn’t work that close to the sun, they’re not about to throw in a random planet with mountains above the atmosphere and ruin that attention to detail.

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34 minutes ago, jimmymcgoochie said:

Я не думаю, что вы понимаете, как работают атмосферы. Атмосфера Земли простирается примерно на 100 км над уровнем моря (только мезосфера - тропосфера простирается на некоторое расстояние за это, и это одна из причин, по которой МКС нужно увеличивать орбиту каждые несколько месяцев), а самая высокая гора не превышает 9 км над уровнем моря. На Марсе плотность атмосферы на 0,6% выше плотности Земли в самой нижней точке, мезосфера по-прежнему составляет около 100 км, а высота Олимпа - самой большой горы в Солнечной системе составляет всего 25 км.

Чтобы горы выходили за пределы атмосферы, необходимы два противоречивых условия: высокие горы требуют низкой гравитации (поскольку более высокая гравитация притягивает их вниз и сжимает ядро), но удержание атмосферы требует высокой гравитации, иначе газы улетучатся. Посмотрите на примеры из реальной жизни - Венера (размером почти с Землю, никакие горы не приближаются к краю атмосферы), Земля (нет гор на удалении от края атмосферы) Марс (постоянно теряет свою очень тонкую атмосферу из-за солнечного ветра, самая высокая гора в солнечной системе, и она все еще  не близко к краю атмосферы), четыре газовых гиганта (высокая гравитация), Титан (что-то вроде выброса с плотной атмосферой, но низкой гравитацией, но все еще нигде нет гор на краю атмосферы) и этим все сказано.

Все, что достаточно велико, чтобы иметь заметную атмосферу, было бы достаточно большим, чтобы горы не доходили до него, а все, что достаточно маленькое, чтобы иметь достаточно неправильную форму и / или достаточно высокие горы, не могло бы собраться и удержаться атмосфере, потому что ее сила тяжести была бы слишком слабой. Если команда KSP2 взяла на себя труд сделать Минмус из стекла, потому что они посчитали, что лед не будет работать так близко к Солнцу, они не собираются бросать случайную планету с горами над атмосферой и разрушать это внимание. деталь.

but it's a game and it's not always real

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1 hour ago, Kerbal wanderer said:

but it's a game and it's not always real

True, KSP imagines immortal green Kerbals who do not need to eat, but it keeps many things realistic.

The recent explanation video (with subtitles in English only, unfortunately) describes at 7:45-- how KSP2 developers worried that Minmus might be too warm for its flat surfaces to be water ice.  So, I think they want to be realistic in the construction of planets.

Some people here might think of something realistic that is at least similar to what you described,  which sounds a bit like an ocean.

If we want tall mountains and an atmosphere that has an unusually well-delineated top, maybe a (recently) volcanic planet, with a molten core creating a magnetosphere to protect an atmosphere  made of relatively dense SO2.  But still, gasses expand into the vacuum, so an atmosphere made of gasses would have a gradual top, getting slowly less dense with height. 

Well-delineated layers form in atmospheres, though, especially layers of condensing vapour.

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On 11/8/2021 at 1:35 PM, jimmymcgoochie said:

I don’t think you understand how atmospheres work. Earth’s atmosphere extends up to around 100km above sea level (just the mesosphere- the troposphere extends some distance beyond that and is one reason why the ISS needs its orbit boosted every few months) and the tallest mountain isn’t even 9km above sea level. Mars, which has an atmosphere 0.6% as dense as Earth’s at its lowest point, still has a mesosphere up to about 100km and yet Olympus Mons, the biggest mountain in the solar system, reaching to a mere 25km.

To have mountains that extend beyond an atmosphere requires two contradictory conditions- tall mountains require low gravity (as higher gravity would pull them down and compress the core) but holding an atmosphere requires high gravity or the gases would escape. Look at the real life examples- Venus (almost Earth sized, no mountains getting remotely near the edge of the atmosphere), Earth (no mountains remotely near the edge of the atmosphere) Mars (losing its very thin atmosphere continuously to the solar wind, tallest mountain in the solar system and it still isn’t close to the edge of the atmosphere), the four gas giants (high gravity), Titan (a bit of an outlier with a thick atmosphere but low gravity, but still no mountains anywhere near the edge of the atmosphere) and that’s it really.

Anything big enough to have an appreciable atmosphere would be big enough that the mountains wouldn’t reach above it, and anything small enough to have a sufficiently irregular shape and/or tall enough mountains wouldn’t be able to gather and hold on to an atmosphere because its gravity would be far too weak. If the KSP2 team went to the trouble of making Minmus made of glass because they calculated that ice wouldn’t work that close to the sun, they’re not about to throw in a random planet with mountains above the atmosphere and ruin that attention to detail.

Agree, Niven has two planets in his Known space series who will not work with real life planets. 
One has an +20 km high mountain raising up over an hot and high pressure  plain around, that mountain will not last long.
The second is an planet who is compressed at the equator with poles a bit like an egg, this leaves the poles in vacuum. 
Yes earth poles are closer to earth center because rotation but atmosphere and gravity balances this out. 

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