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Posted (edited)

https://www.nbcnews.com/science/space/european-star-survey-reveals-celestial-treasure-trove-rcna33250

220613-milky-way-stars-se-1028a-2f2275.j

 

This is cool. 

 

Also - wandering black hole found in the Milky Way... 

https://www.cnn.com/2022/06/14/world/wandering-black-hole-milky-way-scn/index.html

220613154300-02-hubble-isolated-stller-o

 

Significant b/c no luminous stellar companion. 

Edited by JoeSchmuckatelli
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Posted (edited)
13 minutes ago, kerbiloid said:

This one makes to think that we are living in atom.

220613-asteroids-esa-se-1022a-5e1ec4.jpg

 

I saw that and thought, "Giant Space Turtles are real!" 

Odd thing about the image tho - why Earth and Jupiter, only?  Shouldn't Mars be there b/c Jupiter & Mars flank the Ast. Belt? 

Speaking of asteroids:

The random ones that wander close to Jupiter and then get flung inward could be a little scary 

 

Edited by JoeSchmuckatelli
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44 minutes ago, JoeSchmuckatelli said:

why Earth and Jupiter, only?  Shouldn't Mars be there b/c Jupiter & Mars flank the Ast. Belt? 

Mars is just 0.107 of the Earth mass. Who needs this loser?

Belt: 2.8 AU
Earth: 1 AU.
Mars: 1.5 AU

min(Mars-Belt) = 2.8-1.5 AU = 1.3 AU,
0.107/1.32 ~= 0.063

max(Earth-Belt) = 2.8+1 AU = 3.8 AU,
1/3.82 ~= 0.069

So, the Earth affects the belteroids stronger than Mars even when Mars is at the closest distance, while the Earth is at the fartherst one.

Edited by kerbiloid
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8 minutes ago, kerbiloid said:

min(Mars-Belt) = 2.8-1.5 AU = 1.3 AU,
0.107/1.32 ~= 0.063

max(Earth-Belt) = 2.8+1 AU = 3.8 AU,
1/3.82 ~= 0.069

So, the Earth affects the belteroids stronger than Mars even when Mars is at the closest distance, while the Earth is at the fartherst

That's cool - never even suspected as much! 

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Star formation not always inhibited by massive neighbors:

https://www.reuters.com/lifestyle/science/tarantula-nebula-stunning-view-stars-being-born-2022-06-15/

QF52QWDVEVPOTKH2SQ3A2LRECE.jpg

"... we always thought that when massive stars - over 100 times more massive than the sun - begin to form they release so much energy that it prevents the infall of more gas, shutting off the fuel for more stars to form. The beautiful observations of the Tarantula Nebula obtained with ALMA now show that where the gas is dense enough it continues to fall unabated and new stars can keep forming"

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On 5/20/2022 at 9:06 PM, Autochrome said:

This "scientific" news article implies that the moon is tidally locked to the Sun and only one side gets light and the other one is in complete darkness. I assume he got it from the misnomer "dark side of the Moon", even when each side of the Moon receives the same amount of sunlight over the course of a month.

  Reveal hidden contents

So when we talk about a "day" on the moon, it's important to remember that one side of the moon -- the "dark side" -- never gets struck by sunlight. There's not going to be any sunrises or sunsets on the moon, ever. How do we measure a day on the moon, then? This is why such a simple question as "how long is a day on the moon?" is far more complicated than you might expect. 

Even when I was six I knew that the Moon is tidally locked to the Earth, not the Sun.

One Russian-language science news Twitter account (@PowerNaShary) once wrote:

"Elon Musk has promised to deliver Earthlings to Mars in six years. Some think his ideas are madness, but that's unless you realize that it's vitally important humanity bugs out from this olanet before our sun turns into a black hole. Which is 100% going to happen."

Spoiler

"Is our sun different from Mars's one?"

"That's why there are people like Steve Jobs, Bill Gates or Elon Musk, and there are such people as Dmitry Rogozin. Think about that when you have the time."

I have the screens if you insist.

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18 minutes ago, DDE said:

One Russian-language science news Twitter account (@PowerNaShary) once wrote:

"Elon Musk has promised to deliver Earthlings to Mars in six years. Some think his ideas are madness, but that's unless you realize that it's vitally important humanity bugs out from this olanet before our sun turns into a black hole. Which is 100% going to happen."

  Hide contents

"Is our sun different from Mars's one?"

"That's why there are people like Steve Jobs, Bill Gates or Elon Musk, and there are such people as Dmitry Rogozin. Think about that when you have the time."

I have the screens if you insist.

I'd think "Russia is a weird place" 

 

 

...

 

 

(If I hadn't talked to so many Americans who think UFOs are space-aliens and the government is hiding the truth).

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China FAST radio telescope finds first case of persistently active repetitive fast radio burst.

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-022-04755-5

Spoiler

Radio signal translation: that blue star in the third cantilever of Orion in the Milky Way shut the ** up, it's noisy! I'm in the middle of cleaning up another civilization right now, so if you don't shut up I'll be the first one to clean you after the fight!

 

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9 minutes ago, steve9728 said:

FAST radio telescope finds first case of persistently active repetitive fast radio burst

Cool article - I might need to read it again, but I got the impression that the FRB is collocated with a persistent radio source... And got the impression that whatever the FRB is may be orbiting / coorbiting the persistent radio source, which could, with further study, help elucidate what is the FRB source. 

I also like the inclusion of the collaborative telescopes' images along with the radio data! 

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Old news (2018) but if you are into Sun-like stars... 

This one may be our lost twin:

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.sciencealert.com/we-may-have-found-our-sun-s-long-lost-identical-twin-star/amp

"... they found HD186302 - not just a stellar sibling, but a "special" one, they said. It's uncannily similar to the Sun.

 a G-type main-sequence star just a teeny tiny smidge bigger than the Sun, and around about the same surface temperature and luminosity. It also has extremely similar chemical abundances, and is around the same age - about 4.5 billion years old."

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2 hours ago, JoeSchmuckatelli said:

a G-type main-sequence star just a teeny tiny smidge bigger than the Sun, and around about the same surface temperature and luminosity. It also has extremely similar chemical abundances, and is around the same age - about 4.5 billion years old."

This just proves that all stars and planets are not created.

They are procedurally generated.

Some seed values give similar results.

Check and mate, creationists!

Edited by kerbiloid
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19 hours ago, steve9728 said:

signal translation: that blue star in the third cantilever of Orion in the Milky Way shut the ** up, it's noisy! I'm in the middle of cleaning up another civilization right now, so if you don't shut up I'll be the first one to clean you after the fight

Heh - now I'm seeing the why behind your quip:

"China is claiming that its enormous "Sky Eye" telescope may have picked up trace signals from a distant alien civilization, according to a recently posted and subsequently deleted report by Chinese scientists"

... 

"Chinese astronomers are keen to rule out radio interference because it has famously waylaid alien-hunting scientists in the recent past. 

The signal was a narrow-band radio wave typically associated with human-made objects, which led scientists to entertain the exciting possibility that it came from alien technology. New studies released two years later, however, suggested that the signal was most likely produced by malfunctioning human technology, Live Science previously reported. Similarly, another famous set of signals once supposed to have come from aliens, detected between 2011 and 2014, turned out to have actually been made by scientists microwaving their lunches."

https://www.livescience.com/china-says-it-may-have-received-signals-from-aliens

Maybe someday we can watch the Party Congress shouting at each other over Tic-Tacs?  

 

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On 6/16/2022 at 11:50 AM, JoeSchmuckatelli said:

(If I hadn't talked to so many Americans who think UFOs are space-aliens and the government is hiding the truth).

The US is Russia just 15-20 years behind. 

Edited by Pthigrivi
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4 hours ago, JoeSchmuckatelli said:

Heh - now I'm seeing the why behind your quip:

"China is claiming that its enormous "Sky Eye" telescope may have picked up trace signals from a distant alien civilization, according to a recently posted and subsequently deleted report by Chinese scientists"

... 

"Chinese astronomers are keen to rule out radio interference because it has famously waylaid alien-hunting scientists in the recent past. 

The signal was a narrow-band radio wave typically associated with human-made objects, which led scientists to entertain the exciting possibility that it came from alien technology. New studies released two years later, however, suggested that the signal was most likely produced by malfunctioning human technology, Live Science previously reported. Similarly, another famous set of signals once supposed to have come from aliens, detected between 2011 and 2014, turned out to have actually been made by scientists microwaving their lunches."

https://www.livescience.com/china-says-it-may-have-received-signals-from-aliens

Maybe someday we can watch the Party Congress shouting at each other over Tic-Tacs?  

Scientists microwaving their lunches is an sign of intelligence but not extraterrestrial one. 

 

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On 6/17/2022 at 7:33 AM, SunlitZelkova said:

Looking at the author’s other articles, I don’t think this is a serious report so much as it is a neat piece of info with a funny interpretation.

What would one expect from "a Sydney-based senior reporter on HuffPost's trends team, covering U.S. politics, media, pop culture and more" deciding to dabble in aerospace?

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Don't know can this related to the science news but I think is really cool: I'm not in China right now and few months ago my parents said that the 'Government Reserve Sites' (it was the waste land with nearly 1m tall grass) diagonally across the road from my home, was built a primary school using the prefabricated container modules. From a literally wasteland to children babbling in their classrooms in just six months. Yesterday I was curious to try to search how was it looks like inside and I got this: https://www.bilibili.com/video/BV1X64y1h7PF?spm_id_from=333.880.my_history.page.click&vd_source=6fef304b8d0c4737896e6b702ddfbfb3

Fast foward to 02:41. Few years ago I even threw tennis ball for my dog here

Edited by steve9728
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5 hours ago, steve9728 said:

using the prefabricated container modules. From a literally wasteland to children babbling in their classrooms in just six months

That's certainly an impressive accomplishment in that timeframe.

Question: I've seen numerous reports that in a lot of places the rapidly built stuff is also rapidly degrading stuff (water leaks, crumbling concrete, fascia/cladding falling off in sheets - I'm not talking about the criminally negligent stuff, like bridge & building collapses, but rather the 'lipstick on a pig' thing where it looks good initially but then the problems start to emerge shortly after occupation - mold, water leaking, wall paper bubbling, tiles falling off that kind of thing). 

What kind of domestic response is there to the safety issues and loss of value to purchasers/users of buildings that should see decades of utility becoming degraded in 3-5 years?  Are there consumer protections for folks who buy a lipsticked pig?

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57 minutes ago, JoeSchmuckatelli said:

What kind of domestic response is there to the safety issues and loss of value to purchasers/users of buildings that should see decades of utility becoming degraded in 3-5 years?  Are there consumer protections for folks who buy a lipsticked pig?

I've never been in a building like this myself, so I don't think I'm qualified to say what the experience was like inside. But just down the road from my home, on the other side, another traditional reinforced concrete primary school is being built. If my estimates are correct both school gates are estimated to be no more than 300 metres. I think this school in the video should be built quickly for short term to cater for the children in the surrounding area.

Mold, leaking things actually I also quite curious how they fix it: there is a sub-tropical coast city which means we got rainy season in spring to summer that easily make everything mildwed and many typhoons in summer. There is a local TV interview with the head of the school and the engineer who built the primary school. The engineer said that the panels used inside are prefabricated panels called 'cabin panels' (or litral directly translate to 'ship cabin panels') which I think are supposed to be of aluminium construction. "There is no paint, no benzene, xylene or other toxic or harmful fumes in those panels.", said by the engineer. The vice-principal of the school said in an interview that he had "obtained data from a third-party company to test the indoor air quality of the school before moving in, and that he had communicated fully with parents before moving in". This video definatly won't have any English substitle but it have some clips on how it was built: https://weibo.com/1789681642/JwB9SxQLm?refer_flag=1001030103_

Edited by steve9728
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