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Remember that SpaceX rocket that was probably, actually a Chinese rocket that was going to hit the moon - but the Chinese denied it was theirs? 

Well... It left an odd double crater. 

FWQs_reX0AAblLn?format=png&name=small

 

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/moon-double-crater-scientists-puzzled_n_62bd05c0e4b0f6125722805d

Anyone want to help NASA figure out what it was? 

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LHC at CERN summoned the PentaQuark:

Scientists at CERN observe three "exotic" particles for first time | Reuters

MCJTW325CVNDNAYK2WZO66U7PE.jpg

Also - while the number of screens that one guy is using is impressive... please note the additional 'display' that proves why working in Europe is better than working in the US!

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Eleven bottles of beer on the wall.
Eleven bottles of beer...

(And two cups for them).

***

9 minutes ago, JoeSchmuckatelli said:

LHC at CERN summoned the PentaQuark

This explains the earthquake felt last night.

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Posted (edited)

NEWS FLASH

Dark Matter Experiment STILL Finds Nothing

Quote

A massive new effort to detect the elusive substance has reported its first results. Following a time-honored tradition of dark matter hunters, the experiment, called LZ, didn’t find dark matter.

A new dark matter search found no signs of the substance — yet | Science News

Scientists employed there remain hopeful:

Quote

Now that the detector has proven its potential, says LZ physicist Kevin Lesko of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California, “we’re excited about what we’re going to see. 

 

Edited by JoeSchmuckatelli
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34 minutes ago, StrandedonEarth said:

@tater IIRC you once posted a video of roasting chiles. How about some solar-roasted chiles?

If they rotate the camera left a little I could see my house ;)

I saw the story on that yesterday, the only issue would be how close you could get, you need to be able to smell the deliciousness.

 

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On 6/30/2022 at 3:15 PM, JoeSchmuckatelli said:

Remember that SpaceX rocket that was probably, actually a Chinese rocket that was going to hit the moon - but the Chinese denied it was theirs? 

Well... It left an odd double crater. 

FWQs_reX0AAblLn?format=png&name=small

 

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/moon-double-crater-scientists-puzzled_n_62bd05c0e4b0f6125722805d

Anyone want to help NASA figure out what it was? 

Miss this one. According to the Wiki it takes two secondary payloads from Copenhagen Suborbitals  and another one was a briefcase-sized probe from Luxspace made in German. So, congratulations, Luxembourg, you are the eighth which make it to the moon:D

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14 minutes ago, kerbiloid said:

Methane = 50.

But MJ/kg, not per l.

bu-bu-but they said "l"

Quote

However, simulation data to date suggests that POP-FAMEs may produce energy density values of 50 megajoules per liter after chemical processing. That's a notable increase over gasoline (32 megajoules per liter) and RP-1, a kerosene-based rocket fuel that boasts about 35 megajoules per liter.

 

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9 minutes ago, JoeSchmuckatelli said:

they said "l"

The liquid hydrogen can't coexist with the liquid methane, and the methane calorific value is the next after hydrogen

But... They say "hybrid fuel".

They mix the metal filings of the metastable metallic hydrogen, and get a hybrid metastable cryo-bio-fuel with calorific value greater than methane's.

(Or they think that kg = l for everything liquid like water.)

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Posted (edited)

https://www.sciencenews.org/article/tardigrades-space-travel-survival-humans

071622_tardigrade_feat-1440x700.jpg

Quote

 

As a tardigrade dries out, its cells gush out several strange proteins that are unlike anything found in other animals. In water, the proteins are floppy and shapeless. But as water disappears, the proteins self-assemble into long, crisscrossing fibers that fill the cell’s interior. Like Styrofoam packing peanuts, the fibers support the cell’s membranes and proteins, preventing them from breaking or unfolding.

At least two species of tardigrade also produce another protein found in no other animal on Earth. This protein, dubbed Dsup, short for “damage suppressor,” binds to DNA and may physically shield it from reactive forms of oxygen.

 

... And now you know! 

Edited by JoeSchmuckatelli
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The regular gear on the tardigrade mouth is a mystic puzzle like the Saturn polar hexagon.

Of course, if it's mouth.

Upd.
Probably, it is.

Spoiler

59074c0fc5a16f35ec9f273bf946e49a.jpg

 

Mouth

The external appearance of tardigrade’s mouth is like a tube.

ngcb1

[In this figure] Detail of the mouth of a tardigrade. Colored image of the scanning electron microscope (SEM).
Photo by Eye of Science/Science Photo Library


ngcb1

https://rsscience.com/tardigrades-water-bears/

Edited by kerbiloid
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Posted (edited)

Voyager 2 now has five remaining functioning instruments, and Voyager 1 has four. All are powered by a device that converts heat from the radioactive decay of plutonium into electricity. But with the power output decreasing by about four watts a year, NASA has been forced into triage mode. Two years ago the mission's engineers turned off the heater for the cosmic-ray detector, which had been crucial in determining the heliopause transit. Everyone expected the instrument to die.

“The temperature dropped like 60 or 70 degrees C, well outside any tested operating limits,” Spilker says, “and the instrument kept working. It was incredible.”

The last two Voyager instruments to turn off will probably be a magnetometer and the plasma science instrument. They are contained in the body of the spacecraft, where they are warmed by heat emitted from computers. The other instruments are suspended on a 43-foot-long fiberglass boom. “And so when you turn the heaters off,” Dodd says, “those instruments get very, very cold.”

How much longer might the Voyagers last? “If everything goes really well, maybe we can get the missions extended into the 2030s,” Spilker says. “It just depends on the power. That's the limiting point.”

saw0722Folg33_d.png

Record-Breaking Voyager Spacecraft Begin to Power Down - Scientific American

 

(The whole article is really well done - highly recommended!)

 

...

 

Now I'm wondering if KSP2 will have these features - Not read anything about them, or have a clue how they'd model them... but with interstellar travel?  Maybe a DLC?

Edited by JoeSchmuckatelli
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9 hours ago, JoeSchmuckatelli said:

Now I'm wondering if KSP2 will have these features - Not read anything about them, or have a clue how they'd model them... but with interstellar travel?  Maybe a DLC?

Not to turn this into a KSP2 thread, but I could see them being simple science returns occurring at very high altitude from the Sun/Kerbol. Which requires specific instruments to detect, of course.

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Yeah - it's not like you can see it or anything.  A distance from the star based 'measurement difference' in the magnetometer or a putative cosmic ray detector would be simple enough... But frankly beyond the interest of most players. 

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