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42 minutes ago, JoeSchmuckatelli said:

Yeah - it's not like you can see it or anything.  A distance from the star based 'measurement difference' in the magnetometer or a putative cosmic ray detector would be simple enough... But frankly beyond the interest of most players. 

Sounds like the 'deep space' biome.  Not many would care about what demarks the difference, but Deep Space is a biome I would expect in KSP2 between the star systems.

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1 hour ago, Terwin said:

Sounds like the 'deep space' biome.  Not many would care about what demarks the difference, but Deep Space is a biome I would expect in KSP2 between the star systems.

This would certainly be the easiest - and if a player really wants to find it maybe they will 

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56 minutes ago, JoeSchmuckatelli said:

This would certainly be the easiest - and if a player really wants to find it maybe they will 

 

2 hours ago, Terwin said:

Sounds like the 'deep space' biome.  Not many would care about what demarks the difference, but Deep Space is a biome I would expect in KSP2 between the star systems.

These experiments run more or less continuously. Every light year, add a data point. There is only X amount of data to be acquired between any two stars, although as stars drift the starlanes would move…

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Black Hole orbiting star found:

Earth's 'black hole police' discover gravitational singularity near Milky Way | Science & Tech News | Sky News

It is at least nine times the mass of our own Sun and orbits a hot, blue star weighing 25 times the Sun's mass.

 

"For more than two years now, we have been looking for such black-hole-binary systems," added co-author Julia Bodensteiner, a research fellow at ESO in Germany.

"I was very excited when I heard about VFTS 243, which in my opinion is the most convincing candidate reported to date."

"The star that formed the black hole in VFTS 243 appears to have collapsed entirely, with no sign of a previous explosion," explained Dr Shenar.

"Evidence for this 'direct-collapse' scenario has been emerging recently, but our study arguably provides one of the most direct indications. This has enormous implications for the origin of black-hole mergers in the cosmos."

 

 

The (near-)circular orbit and kinematics of VFTS 243 imply that the collapse of the progenitor into a black hole was associated with little or no ejected material or black-hole kick. Identifying such unique binaries substantially impacts the predicted rates of gravitational-wave detections and properties of core-collapse supernovae across the cosmos.

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Bad news, or worst news: The Chinese paddlefish, one of world's largest fish, has gone extinct;.;

There is a documentary about a national animal protection unit that has been set up in a not insignificant area of the Yangtze River basin to conserve and breed these endangered freshwater fish. They did try to breed the Chinese paddlefish here. But unfortunately, this effort failed due to the low survival rate of the fish's low fertility. Fortunately, however, the Yangtze River endangered fish such as the Yangtze swordfish and porpoise that they tried to save here were gradually bred and gradually released back into the Yangtze River.

Edited by steve9728
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News Flash

Dark Matter STILL NOT DETECTED!!!

A new dark matter experiment quashed earlier hints of new particles | Science News

Quote

Potential hints of weird new particles in a dark matter detector have evaporated with new data

In the new analysis, which uses about 97 days of data, XENONnT spotted as many electron recoils as expected due to known particle interactions, the researchers also reported in a paper posted on the experiment’s website. Scientists don’t know what caused the extra detections in the previous experiment, but it’s possible it was merely a statistical fluke, Lang says. Or it may have been due to small amounts of tritium — hydrogen atoms with two neutrons in their nuclei — in the detector.

Unknown at this time whether this is a new article about the last News Flash - or an article that the last News Flash failure to detect dark matter is confirmed by a new lack of detection...

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Nasa seeks proposals for the construction of a "starshade" that can help blending out a distant (tens of ly) star to enable upcoming earth based 30m telescopes with new adaptive optics to image close planets around the star.

It is too early to rejoice, though, right now there's no idea how such a thing could be really constructed and brought into space. Hence the call for proposals.

https://grabcad.com/challenges/nasa-challenge-ultralight-starshade-structural-design

https://microdevices.jpl.nasa.gov/capabilities/optical-components/starshade/

There may even be a (currently hypothetical) chance to support an own 6m telescope in space with these shady doings. Resolution in combination with an E-ELT for instance would be ... would be ... really cool :-)

https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/habex/mission/

 

Edited by Pixophir
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5 minutes ago, kerbiloid said:

What's the problem? Starlink.

Soon the telescope will be awaiting for a slot in the Starlink schedule to look at something between the sats.

 

That's why we put them in Spaaace, now.

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https://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/news/oer-updates/2022/mysterious-holes-seafloor/mysterious-holes-seafloor.html

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several sublinear sets of holes in the sediment on the seafloor at a depth of approximately 2,540 meters (1.6 miles). While the holes look almost human made, the little piles of sediment around them suggest they had been excavated.

Spoiler

closeup-holes-800.jpg

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21 minutes ago, StrandedonEarth said:

The holy grail of archeological finds - but the ad content of the site is the real winner here!  So weird! 

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