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What Jobs Provide Lodging and Food?


Spacescifi
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Just curious.

I live in California.

I currently sleep in my car but work full-time.

I have noticed over the months, especially the hot summer months, that I spend more money on food than I should and I am beginning to tire of this.

My initial plan was to save up for a downpayment on an apartment but given the price of gas and the fact that my wages are not high I would likely have even less if I tried that.

Sleep is havoc at times due to noise.

 

So what other job options are there that provide free room and food?

 

I thought of cruise ships, but I will cry foul if my roommate tries to smoke in the room... since newbies get roommates.

 

Another option is a fishing ship.

 

Also what in the world does my car go while working?

 

Paid parking? A paid storage shed?

Edited by Spacescifi
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What is your skill set?

My niece worked on a cruise ship, and it was like getting paid to go on vacation for six months at a time. She was stage manager for the shows on board. I've looked at IT jobs on cruise ships, and it's fairly similar. If nothing breaks you relax in your cabin and the crew bar for the voyage. Don't know what you were looking at. It's frigging awesome if you're single.

Your car is an expense, don't get emotionally attached to it. If it is costing you money, and you don't need it, sell it.

I can also tell you from personal experience: California is super-expensive for everything. If you're having trouble making ends meet with your current skill set in California: Move somewhere else. Arizona, Nevada, Utah, Texas, all sorts of points further east. (I have a buddy who retired from public service in CA who is living like a king in Tennessee right now, and I am super jealous.)

Broaden your horizons.

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17 minutes ago, TheSaint said:

What is your skill set?

My niece worked on a cruise ship, and it was like getting paid to go on vacation for six months at a time. She was stage manager for the shows on board. I've looked at IT jobs on cruise ships, and it's fairly similar. If nothing breaks you relax in your cabin and the crew bar for the voyage. Don't know what you were looking at. It's frigging awesome if you're single.

Your car is an expense, don't get emotionally attached to it. If it is costing you money, and you don't need it, sell it.

I can also tell you from personal experience: California is super-expensive for everything. If you're having trouble making ends meet with your current skill set in California: Move somewhere else. Arizona, Nevada, Utah, Texas, all sorts of points further east. (I have a buddy who retired from public service in CA who is living like a king in Tennessee right now, and I am super jealous.)

Broaden your horizons.

Skill set?

 

Warehouse order selector/stocker Can drive a fork lift but I only have to do that rarely to stock items that are out of reach.

Yes I am single with virtually no family to speak of.

 

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28 minutes ago, Spacescifi said:

Skill set?

Warehouse order selector/stocker Can drive a fork lift but I only have to do that rarely to stock items that are out of reach.

Yes I am single with virtually no family to speak of.

Amazon has DCs in every state in the union. They aren't picky. If you quit in CA they will hire you in AZ, TX, TN, wherever. Go somewhere where the cost of living is lower, CA is killing you.

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3 minutes ago, Vanamonde said:

The military services would give you food, housing, medical care, and pay, if you're the sort who doesn't mind that kind of lifestyle. 

Having served six years in Uncle Sam's Canoe Club I'm kinda biased here. It's not for everyone, and if you enlist and then figure out that it isn't for you it can have lifetime repercussions. But, yes, it is an option. If I could have toughed it out for thirty years I would have retired with a full pension five years ago, which would have been totally awesome. But that didn't happen. YMMV.

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14 minutes ago, Vanamonde said:

The military services would give you food, housing, medical care, and pay, if you're the sort who doesn't mind that kind of lifestyle. 

And career opportunities.   
 

The judge told my brother in law when he was 18 that he could do 4 years in prison or 4 in the military.    He ended up doing 8 in the Navy and then the last 20 working for a defense contractor doing the same job he did on the boat, but now he makes ~170k a year. 
 

If you’re lost and need a path, the military is a good place to spend 4 years as you figure stuff out.    I think a lot of our vets here will tell you the same.   I know I’d be one of them if the recruiter hadn’t told me he already had his quota for the month a bit over 20 years ago.   
 

I’m sure even the Space Force needs enlisted people, and I think that’s more to your mindset than the other branches. 

Edited by Gargamel
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6 hours ago, Spacescifi said:

So what other job options are there that provide free room and food?

Join holy orders. The Order of Friars Minor (The Franciscans) have a pretty good room and board policy. There would be some obvious  adjustments to some of their other requirements, but it's a pretty good gig until final vows, after which you are sort of in it for the long haul.   

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But what ever you do, write.    That’s what you seem to want to do.   Just keep writing.    Post your stories.   Submit them to publishers of all sorts.   Just write and write some more. 
 

You’re going to get kicked in the face by the editors for a while, but that will only help you refine your style.     Remember Rowling was on welfare and practically homeless while she wrote her first novel.  

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11 hours ago, Gargamel said:

But what ever you do, write.    That’s what you seem to want to do.   Just keep writing.    Post your stories.   Submit them to publishers of all sorts.   Just write and write some more. 
 

You’re going to get kicked in the face by the editors for a while, but that will only help you refine your style.     Remember Rowling was on welfare and practically homeless while she wrote her first novel.  

I think writing also has decidedly mundane advantages. I hate to brag, but despite being somewhat tongue-twisted I seem to have an easier time putting my thoughts into writing than many people around me.

As a slide-drawing cubicle rat, it helps.

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come up to alaska and work for a fish processing plant. if you can stand the smell (and its so much worse than you could imagine). they got bunk houses all over the place. but i think you have to crash with others, and its seasonal work. fortunately its spring-summer so while you arent yanking guts out of salmon you have some of the nicest scenery around and a lot of outdoor activities. and if you want to bring your vehicle you can catch tha alaska marine highway ferry in bellingham, wa. that or drive the alcan highway.  i think the former is your best bet as you can get into one of the many fishing towns in southeast alaska. i think here in petersburg alone we got 3 different processing plants. 

Edited by Nuke
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13 hours ago, Vanamonde said:

The military services would give you food, housing, medical care, and pay, if you're the sort who doesn't mind that kind of lifestyle. 

i tried to join the marine corps out of college, but i was 4-f on the grounds that im a lunatic. 

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I'd strongly advise against joining the military - unless it's something you've always wanted to do.  NEVER join the military for any reason other than that.  I really enjoyed my time; but I'm one of those people for whom the idea of 'service' and 'giving back' is important.  If you don't have solid reasons for serving, you will be miserable.  It is NOT for everyone.  It is incredibly demanding, the hours are ridiculous, the work is hard - and while rewarding, it is a love it or hate it lifestyle.

Peace Corps is similar; you have to 'feel the calling' to succeed - have to be motivated by something more than need or desire for money.

You can make good money doing dangerous stuff in Alaska - most people only ever make it a season. 

Like Gargamel writes above; whatever you do, write.  Journal your experiences if nothing else.  Keep them.

Most young people have to have roommates to succeed.  It's how college students get through college.  Young non-college students are the same; get a job, room with a few people, save your money, and before long you will find yourself stable.

 

I'd also recommend getting on in a 'protected trade' if you want to actually make good money without going to college.  Things like Electrician, Plumbing or HVAC - where you have to pass a Journeyman license board; those trades make good money... and can lead to you becoming a Master Electrician or Master Plumber - where you can own your own business and charge ridiculous money for your work (think $150/trip + $75/hour + parts (bought at wholesale, sold at retail)) in even a small town with low housing costs.  More if you're in a city; but living costs will be higher.

 

Edit:  When I was young and broke as hell, I'd work in kitchens as a prep-cook or short-order cook.  Cooks are never hungry.  You have to bust your *hump* in a kitchen, but if you're good, the pay is decent.  Not talking McDonalds; a real restaurant.  You won't get into anything fancy, starting out, but the local Armenian restaurant?  Sure.

Edited by JoeSchmuckatelli
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55 minutes ago, JoeSchmuckatelli said:

It is incredibly demanding, the hours are ridiculous, the work is hard

Well, except for Chair Force.... :D

55 minutes ago, JoeSchmuckatelli said:

Peace Corps is similar; you have to 'feel the calling' to succeed - have to be motivated by something more than need or desire for money.

Oh, God, one of my cousin's kids joined the Peace Corps and the stories she came back with will turn your hair white. Please, for the love of all that is holy, don't join the Peace Corps. Go do something worthwhile and useful, like playing piano in a cathouse.

55 minutes ago, JoeSchmuckatelli said:

Like Gargamel writes above; whatever you do, write.  Journal your experiences if nothing else.  Keep them.

This. If you want to be a writer, then write. Don't let anyone tell you to do otherwise. But, if writing isn't putting food on the table, have a Plan B.

55 minutes ago, JoeSchmuckatelli said:

Most young people have to have roommates to succeed.  It's how college students get through college.  Young non-college students are the same; get a job, room with a few people, save your money, and before long you will find yourself stable.

Also this. Having roommates also helps you learn how to get along with other people, which is an invaluable skill.

55 minutes ago, JoeSchmuckatelli said:

I'd also recommend getting on in a 'protected trade' if you want to actually make good money without going to college.  Things like Electrician, Plumbing or HVAC - where you have to pass a Journeyman license board; those trades make good money... and can lead to you becoming a Master Electrician or Master Plumber - where you can own your own business and charge ridiculous money for your work (think $150/trip + $75/hour + parts (bought at wholesale, sold at retail)) in even a small town with low housing costs.  More if you're in a city; but living costs will be higher.

One of my friends in high school got into the electrical trades in Hollywood right after he graduated. He's been doing great ever since, getting ready for early retirement here in a couple of years.

You'll do well in any of the skilled trades, actually. Hundreds of thousands of unfilled jobs waiting for workers. Go watch any of Mike Rowe's rants on the subject.

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On 8/4/2022 at 1:33 AM, Spacescifi said:

Skill set?

 

Warehouse order selector/stocker Can drive a fork lift but I only have to do that rarely to stock items that are out of reach.

Yes I am single with virtually no family to speak of.

 

Find a small time guy with his own van or work truck sitting in front of a residential house in a nice part of town.  Not the kind of big name place you hear advertising.  But a guy who looks like he cares about his equipment (truck is clean, has a Master license that kind of thing).  Wait outside and then go up and say 'hi'.  Tell him you're interested in getting into the trade and ask what that looks like.  Ask him how he got started.  Have a card, and leave him your number.  Ask if he knows of anyone looking for a worker who'd be willing to take on a novice WHO HAS HIS OWN CAR - and WILL SHOW UP ON TIME.

 

You'd be surprised how many people are willing to hire someone with a car, a phone and the will to work.  Also - the guy who you meet might not need anyone - but he also might know someone who does need someone in a related field.  That guy, if you present yourself well, will give your number to someone else. 

Hence the card.

 

Edit: if you do get picked up.  Work Clean.  Meaning don't let anything sit around.  If it looks like trash, get a bag and put it into it.  Ask first.  Use the broom often.   The experienced guy with the knowledge needs to be doing the work - but an almost guaranteed way to get called back is to stay busy, clean up and be ready to help.  Do not wander through the house.  Do not use the bathroom.  Have shoe covers.  Don't ever (in a residential neighborhood) be the guy who wants to work shirtless.  Don't have something stupid written on a teeshirt.  

Show up, be clean, look like you care, and help clean up, ask pertinent questions, say thank you when you get paid... pretty soon you're working regularly.  Log your hours, btw.  Some trades, to become a Journeyman requires 2000 hours of work in the field.  That's not driving time, lunch breaks, etc.

Edited by JoeSchmuckatelli
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8 hours ago, JoeSchmuckatelli said:

Find a small time guy with his own van or work truck sitting in front of a residential house in a nice part of town.  Not the kind of big name place you hear advertising.  But a guy who looks like he cares about his equipment (truck is clean, has a Master license that kind of thing).  Wait outside and then go up and say 'hi'.  Tell him you're interested in getting into the trade and ask what that looks like.  Ask him how he got started.  Have a card, and leave him your number.  Ask if he knows of anyone looking for a worker who'd be willing to take on a novice WHO HAS HIS OWN CAR - and WILL SHOW UP ON TIME.

 

You'd be surprised how many people are willing to hire someone with a car, a phone and the will to work.  Also - the guy who you meet might not need anyone - but he also might know someone who does need someone in a related field.  That guy, if you present yourself well, will give your number to someone else. 

Hence the card.

 

Edit: if you do get picked up.  Work Clean.  Meaning don't let anything sit around.  If it looks like trash, get a bag and put it into it.  Ask first.  Use the broom often.   The experienced guy with the knowledge needs to be doing the work - but an almost guaranteed way to get called back is to stay busy, clean up and be ready to help.  Do not wander through the house.  Do not use the bathroom.  Have shoe covers.  Don't ever (in a residential neighborhood) be the guy who wants to work shirtless.  Don't have something stupid written on a teeshirt.  

Show up, be clean, look like you care, and help clean up, ask pertinent questions, say thank you when you get paid... pretty soon you're working regularly.  Log your hours, btw.  Some trades, to become a Journeyman requires 2000 hours of work in the field.  That's not driving time, lunch breaks, etc.

So, it's 1995, I'm three years out of the Navy. I'm working as a tech writer and going to church. And the church building is 50 years old, it's a wreck. And the guy the church has put in charge of maintaining the building is a guy by the name of Mike. He was a licensed contractor, did a lot of remodeling work. Really great guy, I liked Mike. So I volunteered to help out maintaining the building, even though I knew nothing about maintaining buildings (at the time). So I remember this particular work day, Mike put me to work doing some drywall work in the basement. Before this day, I couldn't even spell drywall, now I was installing it. I totally kluged it. It was all messed up. The spackle was all uneven, you could see the screws, it was a mess. Mike comes down to look at what I've done, and I'm really upset, practically in tears. Mike looks over the wall, and says, "Honestly, if I could call in ten guys like you, I wouldn't be living hand-to-mouth." I was shocked. He goes on. "This isn't the best, but you did what I told you to do. And you showed up when you were supposed to this morning. That's all I really need. I could teach you to do everything else."

That stuck with me.

And I really miss Mike. He was solid.

So, @Spacescifi, if you want a life lesson from that: show up on time, do what you are told to do.

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Oh - FYI, some of the shipping companies (UPS/FEDEX) offer 'mailbox' services.  So if you need a 'permanent address' even when you actually don't have one, this might be an option.

 

Don't know how affordable they are... but it works.

 

Also - Saint had a good thought; if you get on with the caretaker of a church - you can ask if you can receive mail there.  You'd have to ask the 'Church Secretary' or something; but just be honest.  You're looking for work and need an address for correspondence.  Would they let you give their address and pick up mail once a week or so.

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A cheaper state is probably worthwhile. Delivery services are always short on people (FedEx, UPS, Amazon), and in a rural area, life is pretty cheap. Here in New Mexico, for example, or rural Utah, etc. Providing housing is trickier... Forest service? National Parks service?

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On 8/3/2022 at 10:10 PM, TheSaint said:

What is your skill set?

My niece worked on a cruise ship, and it was like getting paid to go on vacation for six months at a time. She was stage manager for the shows on board. I've looked at IT jobs on cruise ships, and it's fairly similar. If nothing breaks you relax in your cabin and the crew bar for the voyage. Don't know what you were looking at. It's frigging awesome if you're single.

Your car is an expense, don't get emotionally attached to it. If it is costing you money, and you don't need it, sell it.

I can also tell you from personal experience: California is super-expensive for everything. If you're having trouble making ends meet with your current skill set in California: Move somewhere else. Arizona, Nevada, Utah, Texas, all sorts of points further east. (I have a buddy who retired from public service in CA who is living like a king in Tennessee right now, and I am super jealous.)

Broaden your horizons.

Well... I am kind of attached to my car... in the sense that I live out of it when not working full-time lol. And it is paid for. So all I pay for is maintenance, oil, registration, and insurance.

 

I have never moved before in my life. I presume I would have to apply for a job, get one, and then drive through to another state.

 

Wherever I would work would have to be near the gyms I use for showering, otherwise it's a no go.

On 8/8/2022 at 7:39 PM, tater said:

A cheaper state is probably worthwhile. Delivery services are always short on people (FedEx, UPS, Amazon), and in a rural area, life is pretty cheap. Here in New Mexico, for example, or rural Utah, etc. Providing housing is trickier... Forest service? National Parks service?

I think fedex, UPS and Amazon all pay well enough to live off do they not?

 

So either way I would have to find a new job in a new state. Because as it is, I would have to work another year to get any pension. Another year of eking out a living in my car working full-time.

It's not that I cannot do it, I am a bit concerned for my health though. Although I have begun using the microwave and canned veggies at work along with the freezer, as that is wiser than eating out constantly.

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On 8/4/2022 at 12:22 PM, Nuke said:

come up to alaska and work for a fish processing plant. if you can stand the smell (and its so much worse than you could imagine). they got bunk houses all over the place. but i think you have to crash with others, and its seasonal work. fortunately its spring-summer so while you arent yanking guts out of salmon you have some of the nicest scenery around and a lot of outdoor activities. and if you want to bring your vehicle you can catch tha alaska marine highway ferry in bellingham, wa. that or drive the alcan highway.  i think the former is your best bet as you can get into one of the many fishing towns in southeast alaska. i think here in petersburg alone we got 3 different processing plants. 

How is the pay?

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well the alaska minimum wage is $10.34/hr.  but alaska is also a bit expensive. 

if you live up here all year round then you can apply for the pfd. 

Edited by Nuke
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