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FusTek Station Parts Dev Thread (continuation of fusty's original work)


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75% of the IACBM 1.25 m variant is textured - the remaining 25% is for the inner and outer faces of the main ring chassis, and the surface all the details sit on will need paneling work and snaking cables for the motion controllers. I also need to toss in a normal map as well.

That is looking better. One question - any chance of a variant for use on the three-kerbal command pod? Specifically, either a hinged door or an ejectable flush-mounted nose cone, so my manned flights don't have a bizarre flat-top because of the exposed CBM?

Okay, two questions: Do these visually mate up with the existing Fusty CBM? I realize that 1.25m docking ports connect together via the docking port module in the cfg, but the stock ports and Fusty CBM don't visually connect, and it's a bit jarring when one of my legacy space craft docks at the space station and attaches to the CBM.

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One question - any chance of a variant for use on the three-kerbal command pod? Specifically, either a hinged door or an ejectable flush-mounted nose cone, so my manned flights don't have a bizarre flat-top because of the exposed CBM?

Yes, there will definitely be a variant for use with the Mk1-2 Pod, although it would come under another upcoming (stockalike) parts pack that I'm still prototyping for at the moment.

Unlike the standard 1.25 / 2.5 m IACBMs that will be included in R0.04a of the station parts pack, the pod-specific version will be about the same thickness as the stock Clamp-o-trons and have the yellow hatch pre-integrated into the design.

Okay, two questions: Do these visually mate up with the existing Fusty CBM? I realize that 1.25m docking ports connect together via the docking port module in the cfg, but the stock ports and Fusty CBM don't visually connect, and it's a bit jarring when one of my legacy space craft docks at the space station and attaches to the CBM.

No, these won't visually mate up to fusty's own CBMs.

I can further prevent my IACBMs from docking with any other non-compatible system by assigning docking port IDs that only other IACBMs of the correct type and size would recognize, as described by NovaSilisko:

2. Docking port IDs

I haven't looked into many mod cfgs, but a number of the ones I have haven't taken advantage of this when it would be very useful. So, for docking port modules, the cfg entry looks like this:

MODULE
{
name = ModuleDockingNode
referenceAttachNode = top
nodeType = size1
}

See that "nodeType = size1" entry? That doesn't actually have to be size#. It can be anything you want, then you can make ports that only connect to ports of that same ID, for your own docking systems. No way to make non-androgynous (requires two parts, which can only attach to eachother) ports yet, though.

In my case, my nodeType(s) would be IACBM_125 and IACBM_25.

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No, these won't visually mate up to fusty's own CBMs.

I can further prevent my IACBMs from docking with any other non-compatible system by assigning docking port IDs that only other IACBMs of the correct type and size would recognize, as described by NovaSilisko:

Bummer. Maybe the planned space station will need to hold for a little while longer in the VAB, so I don't have to launch docking port adapters later. Those thicker ports would be nice on the sides of the Karmony nodes.

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Sorry to ask about this on another mod's page, but do I need a part to do this? If so can I just dock it to the already built station to move them around? Like, is my current station screwed or can I recover my little guys?
Crew Manifest is part-less.

What Sapphire said. And I don't think Sumghai minds mention or discussion of Crew Manifest. In fact I'm pretty sure he has even said he made these modules with the idea you WOULD use Crew Manifest or something similar.

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And I don't think Sumghai minds mention or discussion of Crew Manifest. In fact I'm pretty sure he has even said he made these modules with the idea you WOULD use Crew Manifest or something similar.

Correct.

Until SQUAD makes proper IVA navigation between compartments in a vessel or space station, Crew Manifest is required to use these (or any) station parts properly.

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That would greatly increase the danger due to micrometeorites and debris.

Not really; you've got two circles side by side already, the amount of extra glass would be just enough to fill in the gaps.... and I think you're playing a different game if you have micrometeorite damage to worry about!

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I am looking forward to installing these when there finished, however, regarding the cupola why not go very sci-fi and go with an observation module and not a cupola. It could be possible if used for example like aircraft observation portals, see below for examples past and present.

http://www.nellis.af.mil/photos/mediagallery.asp?galleryID=1558&page=24 - MAFEX shot top left

http://montereybay.noaa.gov/resourcepro/images/Enforcement-from-the-air-240.jpg

http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3722/9217519487_8d054f5024_n.jpg

Wouldn't it be nice to have a Chris Hadfield inspired Kerbal either taking shots or playing guitar?

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Duna Rover made with Habitat + Kupola. I think it looks neat but if I go too fast and slam the brakes on too hard it flips over on its back. I've tried enweighting the back end, I've tried sticking RCS linked to the brakes but that is only effective if I pull back like I were trying to pitch up. And even then it still usually flips. I put wheels on the roof so that it could still travel if it flipped but the wheels and roof sink into the ground and it won't drive. Putting the wheels to the very edge of the nose of the Kupola helped but in the end I had to stick girders on there and put the wheels several meters ahead of the Kupola.

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I too love using these modules for making rovers, Starwaster. :) Meet the MoLab:

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In its default configuration, it has a utility, habitation, science and logistics module, plus an airlock. A crew of 4 can live and work there for a month before needing to resupply. Because the design is modular, you can replace modules with more logistics or habitation modules for supply or crew transportation. Alternatively, you can simply use the command module as a short-range three-man rover--it's equipped with full environmental sensors, an extendable and retractable antenna for long-range communication (8 Mm), and a short-range (250 km) antenna as well. The other modules are equipped with short-range anntennae, too, so no precision landings are necessary--so long as they land in a 250 km radius around the command module, they can be driven to it remotely and slotted together.

The solar panels give the wheels more than enough power during the day, and at night the utility module's RTG can fully supply the three remaining modules. (The modules' battery capacity must be tapped if more than three modules are attached to the MoLab.) The landing legs allow the MoLab to deploy into a stable and level configuration at night, or to dock with any immobile bases for resupply. The many wheels act almost like treads, making the ride fairly smooth even when driving across bumpy terrain. Their offset from the modules themselves ensure the modules cannot flip on their sides, and when coming to a sudden stop, the modules' connection can compress, absorbing some of the shock. The one thing you shouldn't do is turn at high speeds--the sway of the "snake" can break the docking port connections.

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I too love using these modules for making rovers, Starwaster. :) Meet the MoLab:

In its default configuration, it has a utility, habitation, science and logistics module, plus an airlock. A crew of 4 can live and work there for a month before needing to resupply. Because the design is modular, you can replace modules with more logistics or habitation modules for supply or crew transportation. Alternatively, you can simply use the command module as a short-range three-man rover--it's equipped with full environmental sensors, an extendable and retractable antenna for long-range communication (8 Mm), and a short-range (250 km) antenna as well. The other modules are equipped with short-range anntennae, too, so no precision landings are necessary--so long as they land in a 250 km radius around the command module, they can be driven to it remotely and slotted together.

The solar panels give the wheels more than enough power during the day, and at night the utility module's RTG can fully supply the three remaining modules. (The modules' battery capacity must be tapped if more than three modules are attached to the MoLab.) The landing legs allow the MoLab to deploy into a stable and level configuration at night, or to dock with any immobile bases for resupply. The many wheels act almost like treads, making the ride fairly smooth even when driving across bumpy terrain. Their offset from the modules themselves ensure the modules cannot flip on their sides, and when coming to a sudden stop, the modules' connection can compress, absorbing some of the shock. The one thing you shouldn't do is turn at high speeds--the sway of the "snake" can break the docking port connections.

What is that thing below the Kupola hatch and between the solar panels? I can't make it out.

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What is that thing below the Kupola hatch and between the solar panels? I can't make it out.

That's the extendable 8000 km antenna (from RemoteTech 2). It is normally retracted when driving in-atmosphere, to prevent damage. The 250 km antennae are used to control nearby rovers, separated MoLab modules, or to transmit basic telemetry in conjunction with a satellite with a large dish. The long-range antenna allows periodic contact with mission control or a planetary base where no satellite is available to accommodate the short-range antenna, and also allows better data transfer rates. For example, the MoLab might be driving during the day, transmitting data on temperature and atmospheric pressure and such, or its current position. When night falls, it deploys the long-range antenna and is able to transmit stored high-resolution video and photography that was taken earlier. :)

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I'm trying to attach some fustek parts along their side ports instead of their top/bottom ports and I can't do it. I know there's a way around this because I've done it before but I can't remember how. Does anyone know?

(this is that bug where if you have something with multiple nodes, up/down/left/right/etc you can only attach on two of the nodes)

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I am looking forward to installing these when there finished, however, regarding the cupola why not go very sci-fi and go with an observation module and not a cupola. It could be possible if used for example like aircraft observation portals

The intention is for the Kupola to more closely resemble the real-life ISS Cupola. These parts aren't meant to be sci-fi.

Duna Rover made with Habitat + Kupola.
I too love using these modules for making rovers, Starwaster. :) Meet the MoLab:

Fabulous work, guys. The pressure's on for me to get the IACBMs ready for R0.03.4a and the IVAs for R0.04a so that I can start looking at other projects such as landing legs and wheels :)

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Progress Report, 23 August 2013

Finished the texturing and 95% of the normal maps for the 1.25 m IACBM.

ksp_fustek_iacbm_1_25m_wip_23_aug_2013_by_sumghai-d6jbtoa.png

Fig 34 - (WIP) FusTek IACBM 1.25 m (3)

Note that the panelling detail on the IACBM is a bit different from those on the modules themselves - contrary to what the average dinky di aussie by the roadside would claim, this is a deliberate design decision, since the docking ports will be sitting snugly in the docking node recesses, and so I omitted the customary gaps between the panel texture.

The only things missing from this WIP are proper illuminators for the docking port lights - as shown by the lighted windows, I'm familiar with emissive textures, but I'm having a bit of a pickle when it comes to defining actual light objects in Unity.

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Did Fusty send you the Munox models? The utility ring has proper lights.

No, I never received anything from Fusty, apart from a few words of advice regarding part development workflow. I had to practically reverse-engineer everything from scratch (apart from textures, which were already in PNG format).

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The first part of Duna Voyager has launched into orbit. Duna Voyager is the mission name; it will be a small fleet of nuclear powered ships establishing a long term presence over Duna. This will be the heart of the mission. A minimalist space station with a warehouse for spare parts so we can build ships in orbit. The other ships will be carrying orbital probes, ground base modules and a kethane refinery ship.

Note that the nuclear drives have not yet been attached to the station. The drive you see was for orbital maneuvers over Kerbin. It will be jettisoned when the mission drives arrive in orbit . They'll be attached via Sr Clamps.

AUic5wn.jpg

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Progress Report, 24 August 2013

Polished off the normal maps and added working lights (including ElectricCharge drain and shutting down if deprived of power). Huge thanks to Artyom (Bac9) for dropping by to help :)

ksp_fustek_iacbm_1_25m_final_24_aug_2013_by_sumghai-d6jg1xp.png

Fig 35 - FusTek IACBM 1.25 m - Final Testing

Next up - 2.5 m IACBMs.

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Polished off the normal maps and added working lights (including ElectricCharge drain and shutting down if deprived of power). Huge thanks to Artyom (Bac9) for dropping by to help :)

Out of curiosity, how many lights do each of these IACBM's have? It looks like they're not just emissive textures, but actual lights (eight of them, if I'm reading the lobes correctly), so I would expect that they get pretty expensive in terms of Unity's performance with multiple lights if you've got more than a handful of these on a station. Or have you not seen a performance problem with them? I'm using a pair of B9 lights right now for visual docking guidance, but this looks far more drastic in terms of the number of lights per docking port. It also looks really good - way better than a pair of little glow lamps.

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Out of curiosity, how many lights do each of these IACBM's have? It looks like they're not just emissive textures, but actual lights (eight of them, if I'm reading the lobes correctly), so I would expect that they get pretty expensive in terms of Unity's performance with multiple lights if you've got more than a handful of these on a station. Or have you not seen a performance problem with them? I'm using a pair of B9 lights right now for visual docking guidance, but this looks far more drastic in terms of the number of lights per docking port. It also looks really good - way better than a pair of little glow lamps.

Each docking port has two red lights, six white lights and an emissive texture for the LED units.

Admittedly, this has the potential to get pretty resource intensive, but they seemed okay so far in these cursory tests.

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