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You Will Not Go To Space Today - Post your fails here!

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So, I was just launching a rocket and then this happened:

NSZ2XpH.png

A few minutes later...

imnH8AN.png

I don't even know

(No, I did not have unbreakable joints on. It somehow stayed in one piece.)

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My first try with STS type wehicle didn't go as planned. Full stack was a tad too heavy so it fell straight to the ground with ET exploding and SRBs going on their own to the space. At least orbiter and Kerbals in it were intact

6D52W8c.png

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Not quite a failure but now that the LV-N only uses fuel, I have almost 9000 units of LOX at my Mun station that can't be used. Since no fuel can be vented I am now sending empty tanks up to load in the LOX and then de-orbit these tanks to get rid of it.

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I was testing a new heavy lifter design for an upcoming mission. Gravity turned...and gravity won.

1OJ8naO.jpg

Here it was before hand.

pPmai35.jpg

Cheers,

~Claw

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See that odd bit of wing there? It's part of the other guy's plane. It's stuck on there like a bug onna windshield.

[img]http://i.imgur.com/YmxhLuQ.png[/img]

Also, a few bits of this one missing too...

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[quote name='Ozzallos']The space. It appears lacking.

[URL]https://www.dropbox.com/s/x8ytfv330cstaxs/screenshot32.png?raw=1[/URL][/QUOTE]
I like your launch escape system.

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Mach 1400? Not if FAR and the heating model have anything to say about it....
[img]http://i.imgur.com/OfY1gMa.png[/img]

And I'd only just taken off as well.

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I built a replica of an F22, with landing gear that folds into its cargo bay. It took off okay, flies okay, closes up okay. So I turned it around to see if it lands okay, opened the cargo bay, lowered the landing gear... and the plane promptly blew up.

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My most common problem is getting all the way there and not having enough fuel to make it back. Wasted it all trying to find a safe and level place to land. #DroneCoresFTW

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Launched my first fully kitted out 44 class yesterday.. Before being given the all important 4428 class number.. Being the 6th generation of locomotive of her kind since 4408s demise.. Like everything she underwent test runs.. 45 degree steering applied.. Generators adjusted.. Everythings going well

One problem.. Its late at night and my steering wheels not plugged in

Full 45 degree wheel steering all or nothing at 25ms..
She didnt like it one bit...

Theres a collection of bogey frames.. Wheels still spinning and a horn littered not far from the end of the runway..

A train...was... Here at one time :(

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So, we'll put the expenses for this one under 'flight test' yeah?

[img]http://i.imgur.com/jqcTdtZ.png[/img]

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[quote name='RocketPilot573']I done goofed.

[URL]http://gfycat.com/RelievedImperfectIraniangroundjay[/URL][/QUOTE]

Valhallaaaaa!!!

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This particular rocket had a curious design flaw in a set of non-protected extendable solar panels set just aft of the payload fairing. During the final phase of my initial ascent, despite being relatively shielded by the cargo fairing, these solar panels succumbed to the violent forces of ascent and exploded...destroying the fairing in the process, exposing the payload to this:

[IMG]http://i65.tinypic.com/23rph0k.jpg[/IMG]

With the payload exposed (the payload was a high resolution resource scanner intended for Minmus), bits and pieces went the way of the solar panels, causing a series of explosions like this one as the attached landing probes disintegrated:

[IMG]http://i64.tinypic.com/23ijlz9.jpg[/IMG]

After several such explosions, the rocket eventually lost critical pieces, including the remote guidance system. The engine, in good health and maintaining a stable trajectory, carried what remained of the mission payload off into the great beyond, to a projected apoapsis of 278km before running out of fuel. It was then decided that in the future, all solar panels, protected or not, should be located [i]inside[/i] the payload fairing.


This next one was the result of a fatal error in the rocket staging. While preparing for the orbital insertion burn, a cargo rocket carrying a resource miner also bound for Minmus advanced a stage to eject the payload fairing so that the solar array could be extended, and the crew could enjoy the spectacular view. Unfortunately, the entire miner was set to jettison in the same stage, abandoning approximately half the remaining mission delta v, and the powerful engines of cargo rocket. After some face palming, it was decided that the miner had more than sufficient dv available to complete it's mission, and the insertion burn was to proceed as planned. However, the cargo rocket had ascended on a relatively steep 30 degree ascent angle, and with some horror, the crew discovered that the miner craft did not have sufficient thrust to complete the orbital insertion before it started to re-enter the atmosphere.

Given that the miner was never intended to enter an atmosphere, or even perform under it's own power around Kerbin, the re-entry looked like this:

[IMG]http://i66.tinypic.com/3126zo8.jpg[/IMG]

The craft was not equipped with a heat shield or parachutes. It would rely entirely on the engines and powerful RCS system (80 thrust forward and back from the RCS system) to slow down the descent and hopefully hit the ocean at a survivable speed. Pictured above is the seconds before catastrophic structural failure, as the crew desperately tried to jettison the overheating LV-N engines in an attempt to live at least a little longer.

[IMG]http://i66.tinypic.com/2hwh0kg.jpg[/IMG]

Evidence points to a failure in engine seperation, and the critical failure of the LV-N engines destroyed most of the miner craft. If you look closely, it seemed that in its final moments, the craft managed to invert (point prograde). The Command pod can be seen on the right, and the faint profile of the craft as it falls apart can be seen in the explosion itself. The only component confirmed to have survived the explosion was the large docking port mounted on the bottom. Other unidentified debris was also spotted descending toward Kerbin, but all was lost to the depths of the ocean after impact.

Three Kerbals lost their lives.

Oh, and to aid in seeing the profile inside the explosion, here is her identical replacement, sitting happily on the surface of Minmus with a partially crippled landing system (note the permanently compressed landing leg. The craft is still landing capable, but touch down will be "interesting"). Also, everyone on the original flight had an identical twin, who are crewing this flight :):

[IMG]http://i63.tinypic.com/2cqb8ea.jpg[/IMG] Edited by Randox

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