Jump to content
  • 0

A slight Gilly-related issue


CHR1SZ
 Share

Question

Well, I've just sort of landed my first unmanned probe on Gilly. However, the pads on the small landing legs I'm using have sunk into the ground, and the lander is happily sliding along the surface at a steady 2.7 m/s and is showing no sign of stopping. It's basically stable, but I cannot quicksave or go back to the space center as the lander is still technically moving! How do I make it stop?! :0.0:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • 0

You might try goosing your engine just a little to get the legs back above the surface. If you have RCS, try that first; Gilly's gravity is so low that a full burn's liable to kick you out of orbit (which you no doubt know). Once you're airborne again, switch your spedometer over to "surface" if it isn't there already and treat it like a very low velocity Mun landing (kill your horizontal velocity; once the retrograde marker's straight up on the navball, let off and float down).

If that fails, I'd suggest finding a flatter place to land. Fortunately, you don't need a lot of velocity to orbit Gilly, just patience...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

Gilly's gravity is so low that sometimes the weight of your lander is not enough to provide friction to keep the lander in place. If you have RCS on your lander, trying hitting N to push straight down and force it to stick. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

I had the same thing recently when I landed on a slope on Gilly. I used my RCS to bring the lander to a temporary halt and did an EVA. I stopped moving long enough for my Kerbal to fly around with every step and try jumping 900m.

I expect it will stop anyway when it gets to the bottom of the hill

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

if you have a really lightweight probe - the torque from the ASAS can keep you up on one leg and you don't "land". Shut down ASAS or everything else that could keep your probe from setting down completely. If possible, force your probe to the ground using RCS.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This thread is quite old. Please consider starting a new thread rather than reviving this one.

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Answer this question...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...