Jump to content
  • 23

What are the most important things you've learned about playing KSP to pass on?


ShadowDragon8685
 Share

Question

KSP is a great, fun game, but it has a difficulty curve like, well, a rocket. I figure there's some critical "lessons" to get yourself over to achieve competence. Here are the ones I've learned, so far.

1: MechJeb. I find KSP to be just about unplayable without it. I know that there are surely some purists who will disagree, but without an autopilot and MechJeb's VAB calculations, I'd likely still be considering myself lucky to so much as make Kerbin orbit, let alone be gearing up for my second shot at a Munar landing. I'd also likely have no idea of what to do without having seen MechJeb do things, but I've watched MechJeb in action enough to have an idea what on Kerbin it's doing and how to do it myself.

2: When in doubt, radialize! I've experienced nothing but bitter, hilarious disaster trying to build vertically, barely able to get ridiculous expanding stacks into Kerbin orbit. Instead, I figured out that I have to build outward; the same fuel tank+engine design, in a serial decoupler arrangement, is vastly less useful and powerful than two/three/four/six of the same fuel tank + engine design arranged radially around another of that same engine design.

3: SRBs, and how to use them. Specifically, SRBs are good for an initial bump to get your rocket engines up to speed and to let them carry some or all of the lowest-altitude work alone, with MechJeb on the limit to terminal velocity setting to save fuel, but it's not really worth it to use them for more than that. Radial liquid fuel engines are so much more useful, I'm pretty sure I could get a radial SSTO going.

4: The KW RockoMaverick engine, for when you don't yet have the Mainsail. This could work with the LV-T30 stock engine and I think it would still be superior, but KW Rocketry is what really sells it. Get a big old 2.5m Rockomax fuel tank stage going, however much is appropriate to the payload you intend to use, and stick one of those KW LFTA 2-1 conical 1.25-2.5 adapter-fuel tanks on the bottom, inverted. Stick on a tricoupler (or a quadcoupler, if you have it - those will definitely make it better,) and attach three KW Maverick D-1 engines. Gives you massively more thrust than the Rockomax Skipper (350*3 = 1050 thrust > 600 Thrust,) with better ISP at sea level and no worse ISP in vacuum and far more alternator output, not that that will matter on your ascent stage. It is heavier by 2 tons, true, but the far greater TWR means you'll ultimately save a lot in getting into orbit, and the RockoMaverick has been consistently lifting payloads into orbit for me that the Skipper can't. Not to mention it looks boss as heck, especially if you have six or twelve of them radially arranged around a central.. :cool:

5: Less is more when it comes to payload, more is more when it comes to engines. If engines are your payload, you're going to have some tricky balancing work to do, and your ascent stage will probably wind up being approximately the radius of the Death Star.

6: Navigation lights. I'm pretty sure they came from B9 Aerospace since they were manufactured by "Tetragon Projects." Use the red lights on the left side of the craft and the green on the right, and I like to put the white lights strictly down the "top" - that is, with the craft as a whole (that is, the first command part) not rotated, the white lights go straight down the middle when facing out of the VAB. This helps so much when you're in space and looking at your ship trying to work out which side is which. (Not to mention it makes your ship look boss as heck. :cool: )

7: Don't forget batteries and power generation! You don't want to SSTO a 45-ton payload and be about ready to embark on a Mun shot only to realize that your entire power supply is the tiny supply in the lander strapped to the top of your transfer stage!

That's what I've figured out, anyway. Some of it may be wrong, but it's what I've got and it's what's worked for me. If it's stupid, but it works consistantly, was it really stupid?

There is one thing I want to know, though...

Is there any practical point to installing fairings without FAR? I haven't got it installed and don't intend to. Fairings look boss as all heck and watching them pop in orbit is great, but without FAR, are they just adding mass and (paradoxically,) drag? Or do they actually shield the drag of their payload and replace it all with their own drag in stock, because that would probably justify the weight several times over on the ascent stage.

Edited by ShadowDragon8685
Lesson 7...
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Recommended Posts

  • 0
Love all the advice, sums up my own experience.

My two cents about MechJeb: Its an autoplay button.

There. I said it. And is true.

Why would I play a game that has a button to automatically "win" the game? The reward of landing on the Mun without crashing for the first time, all by yourself, and without mods or cheats is something you can´t properly explain until you do it for yourself.

Yes, the game could have more built in information and data output, and MechJeb does that... but again, for me anything that gives you the chance to press a button and "win" is not fun.

Once again, someone else telling people not to play the way they want to play. I'm starting to get annoyed with it. No, I'm starting to get angry with it.

MechJeb is hardly a "Win" button. If you don't build your rocket right, MechJeb won't warp you to your destination instantly and grant you 10,000,000 Science. MechJeb can't really help you make a fuel-efficient short hop on Minmus or the Mun, because those aren't things it's good at. MechJeb can't instantly fix your broken design. What MechJeb can do is make sure you don't get frustrated at a design that can work if only you could keep it on track but you can't because you're not a computer. It can get you down onto the surface of an airless rock that you couldn't land on yourself because the shift and control keys are too sloooooow to actually do what you need done when fast throttle changes are called for. It can keep the nose of your craft pointing the way it's supposed to be pointing while you work out how in all the holy frozen hells to get a ship back to Kerbin with less than half the fuel you expected to have on your return trip.

MechJeb is an autopilot. It is not "Autoplay." MechJeb will not scan my parts list, assemble a perfectly efficient, aesthetically pleasing craft with all the capabilities I require, wheel it out to the launch pad automatically, send it up, set its course, fly to wherever, run the missions I want to do, land the lander, hop Jeb out to have him scoop up some surface samples, plant a flag, write a pithy and long flag plaque for me, hop Jeb back in the lander, fly it back up, rendevous with the return stage, dock, jettison the no-longer-nessessary bits of the lander, set a return course, bring Jeb and the boys down in a biome they haven't gotten soil samples or EVA reports from yet, and pull everyone back to KSC to collect the sweet, sweet Science.

That is what playing KSP is all about. MechJeb automates some of the bits of it that people find more tedious or unpleasantly difficult. MechJeb can make a Hohman Transfer for you, it can't build the craft to get there, nor can it decide where to go. It's an autopilot, nothing more. It's not an "Autoplay" button. It is most definitely not a "Win" button, as several debris fields littering the surface of Kerbin and its satellites, incorporating that lovely, nifty radial MechJeb box will attest.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0
words

You quoted my incomplete answer while I was editing, please check back and make your judgement from there. Also I´m not telling anyone to do what I want, I´m sharing my experience and advicing over it.

Also you can install the game, download a proven ship from the forums, tell MechJeb to do the work and bam, autoplay and autowin. No fun. :D

Now seriously: installing mods early on the game can seriously affect the learning curve of the game: the basics of orbital mechanics and astrodynamics. Mods should be used only when you have mastered the techniques by yourself. I agree, sometimes performing the same maneuvers over and over again can be boring, and having an automated aid for experienced players surely is handy, but it would be ill advised to use it without knowing to perform them by yourself.

Edited by Wooks
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

As someone who used to repair computer for many years I should learn to follow my own advise: if you're having weird problems reset it or in this case close and reload KSP if something you were doing worked and you didn't change anything and it stops working consistently...it is alpha after all.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0
Doing things the manual way sucks

Yeah, well, that's just, like, your opinion, man. (And you are fully entitled to it) :)

Come on, it really isn't that hard. KSP has significantly less controls you need to manage than most of the airplane simulators out there (including WarThunder). Most of them don't have autopilots either, because it simply wouldn't be fun.

Agreed, but War Thunder is as far from simulators as a self-parking, automatic transmission car is from rally racing.

Not to mention that a decent chunk of the sim community is apparently more than happy to punch numbers into the flight director and essentially let the plane fly itself (I'm looking at you, tubeliner fans!).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0
My two cents (tl;dr) about MechJeb: Its an autoplay button.
MechJeb is hardly a "Win" button.

Both are undeniably true.

What needs to be said is, MechJeb is autoplay for some - but not all - aspects of the game. And whether you consider these aspects important or not is matter of personal opinion. MechJeb will not plan your mission, MechJeb will not design your ships. Some people simply don't enjoy doing orbital maneuvers and some people don't have what it takes to do them right. If MechJeb allows these people to play KSP and enjoy its other aspects, it's good.

And of course, KSP as is has no "win" condition, so winning consists of whatever you put ahead of yourself as your personal final target, if you need to have one. That may change with the Career game, but never with the Sandbox game.

Learning orbital mechanics is part of the game and KSP provides them in extremely intuitive, easy to grasp way. Compared to reality, at least. In my opinion everybody should get a chance at learning it before he presses that autoplay button, giving up on great deal of what other players consider fun. But if he does so, it's ok. There is a lot of other kinds of fun in the game as well and even people who fail at orbital mechanics should get their chance to access the rest of it. Maybe if they find the game fun that way and become bored by it later, they may even turn MechJeb off and try playing without it.

That's why I believe MechJeb should be integrated to core game with all its features - and appropriate warnings that if you use it, you're giving up on some of key aspects of the game.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

I'm sure to repeat some things already mentioned.

Use both the VAB and SPH. Build rockets, planes, rovers, boats; and whatever combinations you can think of. Its fun.

Include at least 1 battery and some solar panels (at least 3 symmetrically on rockets and 2 on planes, rovers and boats). I put panels and batteries on all but the launch stages.

Once you unlock nuclear power cells, use at least 1 when building craft for outer planets (less solar energy).

Some engines generate electricity.

Use struts.

Kerbal Engineer helps cut down on design time (if you use it).

Install lights on the command pod such that you can see where you are landing at target and see where you will 'chute down to upon return (also for powered return landings).

Plan missions to other worlds' moons to include enough dV to and from the host planet's low orbit.

Do science everywhere (including burning reentries).

Learn from errors and accidents. My Kerbol system is strewn with kerbalnauts stranded on planets, moons and in various and sundry orbits.

If you can't rescue a kerbalnaut, transmit all the science you can.

Use Protractor.

Persistence rewards you!

Edited by Dispatcher
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0
Even pilots receive extensive training for landing without autopilot and they are supposed to be able to land without autopilot every time the situation requires it.

Ground control has no word in enforcing the pilot to use autopilot. It's there as (usually preferred) option but it's always only pilot's decision (and responsibility) what landing method he will use.

KSP is a game and it's always up to the individual what he does and what he doesn't see as fun. You can't cause any damage by crashing your ships, except damage to your own creations.

I don't think we disagree at all, I was just pointing out that qualified, experienced, professional people are expected to use the aids available to them. This does not remove the responsibility they have - that makes them qualified in the first place - of knowing how to do these things without the aids. The pilot of a plane is captain of the ship and the, er, captain of a yacht is, erm, captain of the ship; final responsibility must rest with them as to what they will do and how. ;-0 Something to consider for those that think some people are having fun the wrong way [That's a great expression that I only read in these forums. Who claims it?]

As Wooks said "sometimes performing the same maneuvers over and over again can be boring, and having an automated aid for experienced players surely is handy, but it would be ill advised to use it without knowing to perform them by yourself." [my underlining].

And not only are you likely to do worse relying on aids; you're missing out on a lot of fun too - your comment "... appropriate warnings that if you use it, you're giving up on some of key aspects of the game."

Back on topic:

Don't forget a ladder. Again!

Edited by Pecan
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0
I don't think we disagree at all, I was just pointing out that qualified, experienced, professional people are expected to use the aids available to them. This does not remove the responsibility they have - that makes them qualified in the first place - of knowing how to do these things without the aids. The pilot of a plane is captain of the ship and the, er, captain of a yacht is, erm, captain of the ship; final responsibility must rest with them as to what they will do and how. ;-0 Something to consider for those that think some people are having fun the wrong way [That's a great expression that I only read in these forums. Who claims it?]

I feel required to point out that the captain of a ship does not nessessarily know how to do everything required to make that ship operate. He may not be able to pilot the ship, or repair the engines/trim the sails by himself. The captain's job is to oversee everyone whose job it is to do all of that. He's required to know enough to get his job done, but you can't just take the captain of the ship and put him on any given task and expect it will work out.

Furthermore, there are distinctions between the commander of a vessel (traditionally a captain, but also possibly called a skipper or, in unusual circumstances, a coxswain might hold the position,) and the master. (Also the owner as well, but in this case the owner is irrelevant.) The master of a ship makes the big decisions - the master is the one who says "We're sailing this boat to Shanghai," or "we're sailing for Portland." The captain is the one who organizes it all, and the navigator and pilot are the ones who set the course and apply the throttle.

I'm really, really kind of ****e at setting a course on my own, and even worse at applying the throttle except under the most forgiving of conditions, and by that I mean Minmus. That doesn't mean I shouldn't be allowed to play KSP until I "get over it." That's what MechJeb does - it's a handy dandy pilot and navigator I can give orders to and take over from when and if I have the skills to do it... Or when and if I realize I'm trying to dock a lander to a mothership and I haven't unlocked the auto-dock feature yet. (That was hairy, and sketchy as all hell 'cause the lander wasn't anything resembling RCS-balanced, but kinda fun, too. I never would have been able to do it without MJ to make a hohman transfer to put me within 200m of the mothership, though.)

As Wooks said "sometimes performing the same maneuvers over and over again can be boring, and having an automated aid for experienced players surely is handy, but it would be ill advised to use it without knowing to perform them by yourself." [my underlining].

I know what MJ is doing, but with that stupid navball interface - and the fact that sometimes you're coming up on a parabolic apoapsis far, far too fast for me to get a maneuver planned using the damn thing and orient the craft appropriately - I'd be lucky to get anything done. Not to mention the fact that the navball isn't very helpful, I certainly can't find a heading on it. I'm lucky if I can orientate to the horizon using it, forget about "finding east" on it, and most of what I know about which icons on the damn thing mean what is because MJ actually spells out in english what it's tracking when it orients to an icon.

Don't forget a ladder. Again!

You only need a ladder when you're going somewhere with gravy heavy enough you can't just RCS up to the hatch.

Also, some experience from me: Kerbs tend to explode when they touch land and are exceeding a velocity threshold. It doesn't actually matter what rate they were approaching the ground, just that they're going too fast in any direction. So you can be skimming the ground very quickly and only clip it with a Kerb's toe, and he'll explode as if he'd rode a solid rocket booster straight into the dirt.

Edited by ShadowDragon8685
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0
I know what MJ is doing, but with that stupid navball interface - and the fact that sometimes you're coming up on a parabolic apoapsis far, far too fast for me to get a maneuver planned using the damn thing and orient the craft appropriately - I'd be lucky to get anything done. Not to mention the fact that the navball isn't very helpful, I certainly can't find a heading on it. I'm lucky if I can orientate to the horizon using it, forget about "finding east" on it, and most of what I know about which icons on the damn thing mean what is because MJ actually spells out in english what it's tracking when it orients to an icon.

One thing I need to say, KSP navball certainly isn't stupid. There are a few things that could be improved on it but in general it's an ultimate navigating device. It's fine by me if you didn't spend enough effort to learn how it works and how to use it using available sources (forums/tutorials/youtube/wiki) but you shouldn't blame the navball for it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

A good advice if you are on a rover: switch into docking mode when controlling a rover, meaning "push the little planet thingy down the little rocket thingy" as you can see in this image. Also read the entry on the wiki, enligthening: http://wiki.kerbalspaceprogram.com/wiki/Rover

Docking_lin.png

Now about mechjeb:

One thing I need to say, KSP navball certainly isn't stupid. There are a few things that could be improved on it but in general it's an ultimate navigating device. It's fine by me if you didn't spend enough effort to learn how it works and how to use it using available sources (forums/tutorials/youtube/wiki) but you shouldn't blame the navball for it.

This exactly.

MechJeb and any autopilot mod takes away the learning experience, and that´s my baseline point. If you are learning the ropes of the game you NEED to be able to read all the standard instruments on screen, including the navball.

I´m not bashing anyone here, if you like mods and do things the easy way then do it, is your way to play the game and that´s fine and dandy. But if you really want to get involved and understand the game mechanics then ditch mods and challenge yourself. You should be able to dock two spaceships using only the navball before installing mechjeb.

Edited by Wooks
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

I'm really struggling to hold my tongue here. To put it bluntly, if you can't find east on the navball then you're in no position to be "passing on important information".

Sure, the captain of a ship might not need to know how every single part of the ship operates, but he should at least know how to read a compass.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0
A good advice if you are on a rover: switch into docking mode when controlling a rover, meaning "push the little planet thingy down the little rocket thingy" as you can see in this image.

I will add this:

1) Disable steering for the "rear" wheels on your rovers to allow better high-speed handling, as you will not turn as sharply and be less likely to flip over. The downside of course is a larger turning radius.

2) Keep SAS and your reaction wheels on when driving, and use docking mode/remap the keys so you are not pitching forward when trying to drive forward. This will help keep you rover stable even at high speeds. The downside is it can make turning difficult since the reaction torque will resist the wheel's attempt to turn the rover.

3) To combat the downside of (2), use both turn and roll controls to "lean in" to a turn. Roll (Q and E) still works in docking mode, and by rolling into the turn you are putting more weight on the inside wheels, giving better grip and helping you turn. You are also helping to counter any centrifugal force on your craft from the turn itself making it less likely you'll flip.

4) If you have a lot of torque, periodically turn SAS off for a moment to make sure all your rover's wheels are making contact. I've been able to do some unintended wheelies...

5) When trying to get up steep slopes, consider going back to staging mode. Attempting to go forward will now also pitch your rover forward, which will help push the front wheels down and improve traction. Provided, of course, you don't have so much torque that you do a forward flip!

6) Consider putting a fuel tank and thrusters pointing upwards to provide down force for extra traction.

Here's my Science Rover on Mun crawling up a 45 degree slope with relatively little effort thanks to the upward-pointing traction thrusters:

screenshot348.jpg

7) Consider putting a fuel tank and thrusters pointing downwards to help you jump over peaks and soften landings if you accidentally (or deliberately?) drive off a cliff.

8) Use structural trusses as bumpers to help guard delicate parts from crashes... as long as those bumpers don't obstruct the function of the parts they protect.

=Smidge=

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0
I feel required to point out that the captain of a ship does not nessessarily know how to do everything required to make that ship operate. He may not be able to pilot the ship, or repair the engines/trim the sails by himself. The captain's job is to oversee everyone whose job it is to do all of that. He's required to know enough to get his job done, but you can't just take the captain of the ship and put him on any given task and expect it will work out.

Furthermore, there are distinctions between the commander of a vessel (traditionally a captain, but also possibly called a skipper or, in unusual circumstances, a coxswain might hold the position,) and the master. (Also the owner as well, but in this case the owner is irrelevant.) The master of a ship makes the big decisions - the master is the one who says "We're sailing this boat to Shanghai," or "we're sailing for Portland." The captain is the one who organizes it all, and the navigator and pilot are the ones who set the course and apply the throttle.

I'm really, really kind of ****e at setting a course on my own, and even worse at applying the throttle except under the most forgiving of conditions, and by that I mean Minmus. That doesn't mean I shouldn't be allowed to play KSP until I "get over it." That's what MechJeb does - it's a handy dandy pilot and navigator I can give orders to and take over from when and if I have the skills to do it... Or when and if I realize I'm trying to dock a lander to a mothership and I haven't unlocked the auto-dock feature yet. (That was hairy, and sketchy as all hell 'cause the lander wasn't anything resembling RCS-balanced, but kinda fun, too. I never would have been able to do it without MJ to make a hohman transfer to put me within 200m of the mothership, though.)

I know what MJ is doing, but with that stupid navball interface - and the fact that sometimes you're coming up on a parabolic apoapsis far, far too fast for me to get a maneuver planned using the damn thing and orient the craft appropriately - I'd be lucky to get anything done. Not to mention the fact that the navball isn't very helpful, I certainly can't find a heading on it. I'm lucky if I can orientate to the horizon using it, forget about "finding east" on it, and most of what I know about which icons on the damn thing mean what is because MJ actually spells out in english what it's tracking when it orients to an icon.

You only need a ladder when you're going somewhere with gravy heavy enough you can't just RCS up to the hatch.

Also, some experience from me: Kerbs tend to explode when they touch land and are exceeding a velocity threshold. It doesn't actually matter what rate they were approaching the ground, just that they're going too fast in any direction. So you can be skimming the ground very quickly and only clip it with a Kerb's toe, and he'll explode as if he'd rode a solid rocket booster straight into the dirt.

East is 90 degrees, South 180, West 270, North 0.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

Docking is easy, as long as you have RCS symmetry. You put RCS on the center of mass or equidistant from it, and you can translate without a problem.

Don't forget those solar panels! Especially for probes: never go anywhere without either backup batteries or a standard panel.

RCS farther out from the COM gives you better leverage: RCS thruster on a girder will give you more control than on the hull.

Throttle back on your jets when you have an SSTO at high altitudes to milk a little bit more time out of the jets. Keep doing this until you can no longer keep your speed accelerating.

Pitch to the 90 degree mark when launching for an extra Delta V boost.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

Mechjeb for me was pretty much the tutorial system. It's not as good as a human at some stuff such as docking (uses loads of RCS) and atmospheric flight when you have FAR installed.

I do still have mechjeb and install it on all my craft and use it for the boring stuff ( keeping aligned during a 5 min burn for example).

I don't feel Mechjeb has hindered my understanding the game or prevented my from slowly accumulating the skills to fly and land all my designs. Furthermore I think it should be recommended to new plays as a method learn how orbital manoeuvres are done

For me KSP is 90% a game of designing stuff, flying things is just to prove my designs meet there performance objectives, this if an autopilot can do I'm happy to let it. (However, it is stratifying knowing you can do it on your own)

But as a lot of people have already said the number 1 piece of advice is:

Learn how to read the Navball!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

Pilot finds challenge in piloting the... thing he has put together

Engineer can find challenge in making a craft even he can handle.

Of course, most of us have something from both sides, and that's a great thing about KSP - you can compensate for one of these abilities with the other. Then you get something you can use - and with that you can learn what you lack on both sides, and perfect the both! And then you'll be able to create and pilot something that seemed impossible before.

P.S. I'm actually a terrible pilot. Have played Orbiter a bit - never got the Delta Glider to properly land on a runway. Aircrafts in KSP? Not too good either... At least I learned to pilot landers.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

I guess I'll add my two cents.

Remap the rover controls to arrow keys and remove the bindings for moving the camera with buttons. This will help a lot with rovers.

Use procedural mods, like procedural wings, fairings, stretchySRBs etc. You will have a lot more options like this.

Have a way to calculate your Dv. Be it mechjeb, Kerbal Engineer or a paper and a pencil, it's the best way to avoid making overpowered rockets.

Try to keep your space clean. Ditch empty stages so that they'll fall back into the atmosphere, collide with a planet/moon or if you really have to leave it in orbit, make sure you can deorbit it, either by putting a probe core on it and leaving some fuel, or by bringing another rocket to do it.

When you make a probe, try to place the solar panels so that at least one would face the sun no matter which direction you're pointed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

1) Do things when you're ready to do them, because you want to do them, and because you need the challenge. Don't do them because you see other people doing it, and you feel you must do it too.

2) Try not to get discouraged if your design looks like a toaster next to someone's gleaming, gold plated beacon to the science gods.

3) Never tell someone how to "fix" their design because it isn't how you would do it. When they ask why it's broken, give them ideas how to fix the design, not how to do it your way.

4) It's a game, enjoy it as such and let others enjoy it how they would like. If they aren't enjoying it, ask them why and give ideas of what to do, not how to play it your way.

5) Kerbals have a heck of a lot of EVA propellant, and can do some amazing suborbital moon hops themselves to collect some of that science-y goodness if you can pick a good landing site.

6) Go launch an orbiter just for the sake of playing around with the orbit. Don't plan on doing any science, landing on the Mun, or whatever. Just go fly and watch Kerbin rotate underneath you. (i.e. Don't forget to look out the window once in a while.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

1. If mods are your thing, do them, if not don't.

2. Regardless of your choice for #1, remember, you set your own goals, hopefully you set all of them with fun as mission priority number one.

3. The navball is your best friend, it removes concerns about which way the camera is pointing as you try to maneuver your craft.

4.When in doubt about delta-v add more boosters OR reduce weight.

5. Struts and symmetry do not always a stable craft make. If your rocket is spinning, a lot, and you've loaded your craft with SAS, RCS, and wings/fins, it's likely a strut and/or symmetry problem.

6. Scot Manley's videos are excellent for inspirations, however, they should not be the expectations you set for yourself.

7. Stock KSP aerodynamics means that if there's a drag measurement on the part your using, then it will exert drag regardless of location on your craft.

8. When leaving a body, there is such a thing as wasted speed, you don't need to hit mach 7 to make orbit.

9. Remember to have some power sources on your vehicles, I can't tell you how many probes I've lost and Kerbals I've stranded because I forgot batteries and/or solar panels

10. It's a sandbox game, there are millions of ways to do something, for you the only important way is the one that you want to do.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Answer this question...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...