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It's 1500 Meters per Second of �V! STOP SAYING 1500 Delta V


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It's like getting an extra 150 dV out of a design with a few small changes...

NO! It's like getting an extra 150 m/s of dV out of a design.

Here's what saying "an extra 150 dV out of a design" is like:

It's like saying I need this room to be a few temperatures higher.

It's like saying that space is a few heights above the stratosphere.

It's like saying that you need to be a few IQs higher instead of a few points higher on the IQ score.

It's like saying that the Saturn V has more volumes in it's fuel tank than the Saturn IB.

Also, it's Άnot D or d.

Edited by GregroxMun
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I think we all understand that "M/sec" is implied when people speak of DV. Point in fact, "delta vee" is actually shorthand for "change in velocity", which is also technically incorrect, as "velocity" requires a Cartesian vector. So if you *insist* on using correct terms, it's "X meters per second change in speed" so have at it. Otherwise, I understand what people mean when they say "fifteen hundred dV".

And while we're on a grammar .... kick, you should use quotation marks within sentences that contain quotes. ex. It's like saying "I need this room to be a few temperatures higher".

/Nobody's perfect :)

Regards,

-Slashy

p.s. It's rude to call out other posters by name as you have done here.

Edited by GoSlash27
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Actually it depends on the question whether your readers know which unit is used.

If a car driver (in germany) asks his passenger: Are we fast enough

and the pasenger answers with: Give me 20 more

Then both understand that km/h is meant and not m/s, litres or lightyears

Its all about conventions. Similarly as everyone understands that in case of dV m/s is the unit used ...

problems will only arise if colmo meant 150 km/s :D

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For the record, Imb fine fith Delta, D, d or Άfor the ÃŽâ€v sign. I just don't like it when people use ÃŽâ€v as a unit. It's not even a little bit a unit.

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And while we're on a grammar .... kick, you should use quotation marks within sentences that contain quotes. ex. It's like saying "I need this room to be a few temperatures higher".

And please don’t use those straight abominations but proper “opening†and “closing†marks.

:D

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The meters aren't meters, either.

For that matter, the seconds may or may not be seconds, it depends on which hardware timer they're working off of and whether your PC is overclocked and whether any of that overclocking happens after windows boots.

If we're being pedantic, let's be really pedantic!

The "seconds" also vary by where you are on the earth, different spots have different velocities. Hell time of day and season probably matter too.

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Also, it's Άnot D or d.

Specifically, Άmeans 'change in'. So if you'd like everyone to say 'an additional fifteen meters per second of change in velocity' rather than '+1500dV', I think you're gonna have a hard time.

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The meters aren't meters, either.

For that matter, the seconds may or may not be seconds, it depends on which hardware timer they're working off of and whether your PC is overclocked and whether any of that overclocking happens after windows boots.

If we're being pedantic, let's be really pedantic!

The "seconds" also vary by where you are on the earth, different spots have different velocities. Hell time of day and season probably matter too.

Alleged meters per ostensible second change in speed? :D

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Context in linguistics is essential, as it allows us to shorten our statements considerably without significant risk of misunderstanding on the listener's behalf. This is an excellent example of that in action: nobody here is likely to see "1500dV" and think "1500 what?", save perhaps the pedantic. Everything in the game is measured in meters per second for velocity, and we know that dV means change in velocity, therefore we know when we see "1500dV" that it means "1,500 meters per second of change in velocity potential" without having to see it written out like that.

Context. Learn to use it well, and you'll go far in improving your communications skills. Be pedantic about word use, and people will just come to the conclusion that you're not very good at catching onto context.

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The "d" in 1500dV might also be a differential operator. It sort of makes sense when you think of it like that. "I need 1500dV" could be understood as "dK=1500dV", with K being required velocity function and V being current velocity function (of time, of course). :) Integrate and you get K=1500V at any point of time. So basically, you need to go 1500m/s faster at every point of your trajectory.

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Context in linguistics is essential, as it allows us to shorten our statements considerably without significant risk of misunderstanding on the listener's behalf. This is an excellent example of that in action: nobody here is likely to see "1500dV" and think "1500 what?", save perhaps the pedantic. Everything in the game is measured in meters per second for velocity, and we know that dV means change in velocity, therefore we know when we see "1500dV" that it means "1,500 meters per second of change in velocity potential" without having to see it written out like that.

Context. Learn to use it well, and you'll go far in improving your communications skills. Be pedantic about word use, and people will just come to the conclusion that you're not very good at catching onto context.

Well... people will come to a conclusion, anyway. Perhaps not that one...

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