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For Questions That Don't Merit Their Own Thread


Skyler4856
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Got this on Facebook. Interesting, huh?

http://i60.tinypic.com/33ndggl.jpg

Will they die or not?

Image linked in the chat:

DSCF1710.png

That stuff looks dangerous to me. Not sure if radioactive, considering the vial was not opened, meaning this is how it was originally stored. Does people store radioactive material in glass vials like these? Shouldn't it be in something...more protective, if they have any sense at all?

Then again, we have no idea.

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It takes very little radiation for the right materials to glow in the dark. Watches that used phosphorus and radiation source to make marks permanently glow in the dark used to be commonplace back in the day.

So it's entirely possible for whatever it is to be perfectly safe. Maybe if somebody had a full readout of these markings it'd be possible to say more.

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Image linked in the chat:

http://s24.postimg.org/e95w93a5x/DSCF1710.png

That stuff looks dangerous to me. Not sure if radioactive, considering the vial was not opened, meaning this is how it was originally stored. Does people store radioactive material in glass vials like these? Shouldn't it be in something...more protective, if they have any sense at all?

Then again, we have no idea.

Well, hospitals do use radioactive stuf for Xrays and stuf.

I've read stories about people finding highly radiactive materials in abandonned hospitals that did indeed glow. The end result was not pritty, though in that story they oppened it

I'd bring it to some kind of expert. And NOT keep it in your pants pocket while doing so

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Not a story, that happened at Goiana, Brazil. Scrap metal scavengers found 137CsCl radiotherapy source in old hospital, opened it, found blue glowing stuff. Head of scrapyard brought it into his house. Four fatalities.

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Not a story, that happened at Goiana, Brazil. Scrap metal scavengers found 137CsCl radiotherapy source in old hospital, opened it, found blue glowing stuff. Head of scrapyard brought it into his house. Four fatalities.

The cesium sources are used for chemotherapy; they are also used for irradiating animals and cells as part of experiments. The lethal dose is something like 210 seconds.

These are generally on of the most guarded pieces of equipment at most institutions. There is a variety of equipment with radioactive sources in them, and the sources have to be removed before disposal, this is supposed to be handled by the environmental safety folks at most institutions. The problem is that no-one wants to transport or dispose anymore, and it gets very expensive proposition, if the institute runs short of money.........

I should poiont out that fatal chemical safety accidents, are several magnitudes more frequent than isotope related fatalities.

- - - Updated - - -

It takes very little radiation for the right materials to glow in the dark. Watches that used phosphorus and radiation source to make marks permanently glow in the dark used to be commonplace back in the day.

So it's entirely possible for whatever it is to be perfectly safe. Maybe if somebody had a full readout of these markings it'd be possible to say more.

Yes and in fact this was one of the most tragic isotope related incidences, during the early 20th they hire young women to paint the 'glow' on the elements of pocket and wrist watches. They used to tip the brush to their tongue to sharpen the end of the brush, over time the isotope accumulated in their bones and they began to erode.

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Maybe if somebody had a full readout of these markings it'd be possible to say more.

Enhancing the picture a bit, the markings read:

TLOS

ZAGREB

ml in 20°C

TLOS happens to be a manufacturer of technical glassware based in Croatia, so this is probably just a generic vial. I doubt anyone in a hospital would be using generic test tubes to handle radioactive material, fluorescent marker fluid, or any other pharmaceutical product.

Smells hoax to me.

Edited by Nibb31
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Enhancing the picture a bit, the markings read:

TLOS

ZAGREB

ml in 20°C

TLOS happens to be a manufacturer of technical glassware based in Croatia, so this is probably just a generic vial. I doubt anyone in a hospital would be using generic test tubes to handle radioactive material, fluorescent marker fluid, or any other pharmaceutical product.

Smells hoax to me.

I think you're mistaken. What are they supposed to be carried in? Unobtainium-mithril alloy? LOL

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I think you're mistaken. What are they supposed to be carried in? Unobtainium-mithril alloy? LOL

In a hospital setting, radiotherapy material would typically be packaged in some sort of shielded cartridge for use with the specific machine that it is designed for. Hospital personnel wouldn't be expected to manipulate the raw material by removing it and pouring it into vials and generic test tubes.

220px-Teletherapy_Capsule2.svg.png

gamma137cs_disk_en.jpg

Cs-Capsules.jpg

In addition, depending on which country the folks who supposedly found the vial in a hospital basement claim to be, the probability of finding a test tube from Eastern Europe might also make the claim dubious.

Edited by Nibb31
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  • 4 weeks later...
Image linked in the chat:

http://s24.postimg.org/e95w93a5x/DSCF1710.png

That stuff looks dangerous to me. Not sure if radioactive, considering the vial was not opened, meaning this is how it was originally stored. Does people store radioactive material in glass vials like these? Shouldn't it be in something...more protective, if they have any sense at all?

Then again, we have no idea.

Really depends on how active it is (assuming it even is radioactive). Lots of weak radioactive sources are stored just between two wafer thin pieces of glass stuck together. The dangers of radioactivity are very frequently exaggerated. Yes, radioactive sources can be incredibly dangerous.

No, not all radioactive sources are even remotely dangerous.

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How do photons have energy if they are massless?

E=hf

Energy of the photon is equal to the product of planks and frequency.

This does look like i'm just quoting an equation, but the energy of a photon is entirely governed by frequency. Almost like mass.

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How do photons have energy if they are massless?

Their rest mass is zero in the standard modell of particle physics. But they're always moving with c in vacuum, so there is no system where they are at rest. If they hit an object their energy is absorbed from the object.

E=hf

Energy of the photon is equal to the product of planks and frequency.

This does look like i'm just quoting an equation, but the energy of a photon is entirely governed by frequency. Almost like mass.

For general relativity: E=m*c^2 => h*f=m*c^2 <=> m=h*f/c^2 ...so mass depends on frequency. And they are getting diffracted from a gravitational field, e.g. a gravitational lense

For quantum mechanics a photon has a momentum which is linked to frequency => p=m*c with the eq. above you can write p=m*c= h*f/c ... or p=h/lambda for wavelength. See also photoelectric effect.

You can easily imagine photons from the sun hitting particles from a comet and forming the comet's tail away from the sun.

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Their rest mass is zero in the standard modell of particle physics. But they're always moving with c in vacuum, so there is no system where they are at rest. If they hit an object their energy is absorbed from the object.

For general relativity: E=m*c^2 => h*f=m*c^2 <=> m=h*f/c^2 ...so mass depends on frequency. And they are getting diffracted from a gravitational field, e.g. a gravitational lense

Not true at all. The energy of a body is only approximately E=Mc² at velocities much lower than the speed of light. Photons travel at the speed of light, hence it entirely does not apply at all.

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How do photons have energy if they are massless?

E² = (pc)² + (mc²)²

Photons have no rest mass (m = 0), but they always have momentum. So the energy contribution is entirely from momentum of the photon.

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