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Rakaydos

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About Rakaydos

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  1. Congratulations, you just added a piston system, one that only works for the heads of crew members who are strapped in at the time. The entire point of the Orion piston system is to be a pillow for the whole spacecraft at once. A really well designd pillow, that allows higher useful acceleration by dampening the detonation pulse into a continuous stroke of acceleration.
  2. And because this author is notorious for not getting the point let me give an example with numbers. You're floating in your cabin and the captain says they're about to engage the Orion drive, so you float over to the back wall. There's a countdown, and when it reaches zero the entire room seems to suddenly start moving. The back wall impacts you at 3.6 km an hour, and you bounce away from it because you're still in zero g. One second later, the room jerks forward again, and you impact at another 3.6 km an hour. This happens again once per second for about 10 minutes. That's 600
  3. The problem is, each munition in an Orion drive only releases a single pulse, which passes over your entire spacecraft at almost the speed of light. That means your change in velocity per pulse, is however many meters per second, times an insanely small fraction of a second. Basically if you don't have a piston on the back of the spacecraft, your passenger's legs have to be the piston,to absorb the spacecraft suddenly moving when it wasn't before. It also means that there is no acceleration between bomb pulses. That means there's nothing to hold you against the ground, so the next ti
  4. Speculation on NSF is that the white sections Will go to join the other lunar lander mock-ups.
  5. You're missing my point. On average, every single point in the orbit will receive the same number of relativistic hydrogen ions. As such, it doesn't alter the plane of the orbit so much as it shifts the plane of the orbit aft. This provides a drag force back on the gas giant due to gravitational coupling, which the fusion candle will have to compensate for.
  6. Statistically, debris should be striking evenly on all points of the orbit. It's no worse than the planet the moon's orbiting flying out from underneath them. If a piece of debris is large enough that the impact could significantly alter the inclination at a single point, you should be able to see it coming far enough out to Miss it if you try hard enough.
  7. Building a gas-giant colony ship is not as difficult as it looks. Build a fusion candle. It's called a "candle" because you're going to burn it at both ends. The center section houses a set of intakes that slurp up gas giant atmosphere and funnel it to the fusion reactors at each end. Shove one end deep down inside the gas giant, and light it up. It keeps the candle aloft, hovering on a pillar of flame. Light up the other end, which now spits thrusting fire to the sky. Steer with small lateral thrusters that move the candle from one place to another on the gas giant. Steer ve
  8. I'm calling "it worked last time " as the second rocket lab launched to have reusability.
  9. Practicing countdown and fueling ops, and other mission control related operations. In general, they want to figure out how not to have so many holds.
  10. Dragon can talk with the ground, or radio the station, but is having trouble connecting the CAT-5 cable to connect "hard line" with the station. As with most aerospace problems, "I could probably solve this with my boot if I could GET TO the problem."
  11. Especially since Horus does not have storms in his portfolio. Set does. And they're kind of enemies. By invoking Horus you brought the wrath of Evil Day.
  12. Thou shalt not invoke the demon Murphy.
  13. At 500 starlinks a flight, that's still 60 flights every 5 years for the full constellation, if I recall correctly. One flight a month baseline load, while also supporting other missions, can justify plenty of reuse.
  14. There's a super rotation, which I've always assumed to be like a jet stream on steroids. Anyone want to correct me on that?
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