Foxster

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  1. I don't see how you hope to get that behemoth to Eve and, particularly, down to the surface. Making it much, much smaller would make getting it there easier and likely fix your shimmy issues.
  2. Just stick a Communotron 16 antenna on the front of the mk1 cockpit. Will raise the max temp from 1100° to 2000°. This quick-and-dirty aircraft can do mach 5 at 18km no problems.
  3. Well, good luck. Do post your craft here when you get it working.
  4. I think you are going to struggle. It's barely possible to have a no-payload SSTO make orbit and even then its difficult. It's hard to imagine doing it with a useful-sized payload of a rover and, presumably, mining gear. If you want a rover to visit several locations then it might be worth considering a mining-refueling rocket plane doing hops. The last leg back to orbit with the science/crew could be done with another small rocket either carried too or else dropped to rendezvous on the surface.
  5. My point is not whether it's possible but whether it's useful. The OP wanted to do some stuff on the surface of Eve and return. For that there are better option than an SSTO.
  6. Two things: 1. SSTOs are not really practical for Eve. They are so borderline that they are usually impractical for anything other than bragging rights. 2. dV figures for surface to orbit on Eve are mostly useless. You can build a massive craft with much more than the listed dV required that will never make orbit due to the very high drag of every part in Eve's atmosphere. Plus the poor isp of most engines there means achieving the listed dV is even harder. Your best bet will remain using a more conventional rocket and abandoning everything but the crew on the surface.
  7. Another lateral solution here is to not take such a big craft that requires all those heatshields. Have a look at other player's craft for Eve. One big thing is that drag is most important in Eve's souposphere. By making your craft with slimmer/smaller tanks & engines you will greatly reduce drag and still be able to make orbit even though the indicated dV of the craft is less.
  8. If anyone would like to try this craft then the complete mission craft (including lifter and transfer stage) is here: https://www.dropbox.com/s/sas721xlp2ptqwp/New Mun 3.craft?dl=0 The final stage fuel tanks are turned off to stop the fuel-cells using them. Remember to turn them back on before lifting off the Mun. It's for a quasi-Apollo mission.
  9. You just need lots of drag at the back. Whatever you fancy of: An inflating heat shield, lots of air brakes (could be a 20+), or several wing pieces perpendicular to the direction of travel...
  10. Just leave them there to die. Plenty more where they came from and no one will mourn them.
  11. One way around that is to put a capsule of some kind on the bottom of the craft. Transfer the crew in and out of that to the main capsule at the top of the craft. Dump it before lifting off.
  12. I'm guessing that even though you have an even distribution of fuel tanks they aren't being used evenly and so the CoM shifts. Check out the fuel priority setting for the tanks and make sure that it is set the same for symmetrically mounted tanks.