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mikegarrison

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About mikegarrison

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    IRL Aero Engineer

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  1. Lots of times the rules for these things are super complicated and somewhat ambiguous. Almost certainly they didn't realize the interpretation of their proposal and the interpretation of the rule were in conflict. This is one reason why these things *often* end up in court.
  2. So many shake-my-head issues here. Let's start with one: Please meet my little friend, Mr. Bar. First name Error. Error Bar gets a lot of work in science, because data derived from real tests abso-f'ing-lutely can lie. For all sorts of reasons. Next is the question of computational engineering (or even physics). The results of any model are only at best as good as the model. Model has a bug in it? Bad results. Model is perfectly coded but makes a simplifying assumption that wasn't true? Bad results. Model is great at jobs X and Y, but you use it for Z? Bad results. You see where I
  3. Of course it can. Changing *anything* can hurt things. For example, it says they *may* have been loading too much oxygen. That means they *may* *not* have been loading too much oxygen, right?
  4. We see a similar progression in airplanes. It was about 30 years between the Wright Flyer and the DC-3. Another 30 years to the 747. It's been almost another 60 years, and modern airplanes don't seem all that grossly changed since the early 60s. (However, many things actually are different, like the fact that they now almost fly themselves, and you can instantly connect to almost anywhere in the world while you are flying on them.)
  5. I guess I missed the anniversary of the launch (April 12), but today is the 40th anniversary of the first Shuttle landing. (RIP John Young -- walked on the moon and flew the first Shuttle mission.) It was only 20 years between Vostok 1 and STS-1. It's been 40 years since. That's kind of wild.
  6. So the US went from having no rides up the the ISS to having so many that they can't find room to park them all?
  7. NS2 launched and landed five times in a year -- before the end of 2016. Falcon 9 has beaten that with a of couple boosters at 6+ launches in a year, but not until 2021. We have no idea what the actual turn time is for either booster (except that it can't be longer than the observed relaunch times), but comparing them in this manner seems pretty silly. The two companies clearly have different goals and desires and methodologies. I don't complain about F9 boosters because they don't have the usage rate and turn times of 737s. I don't understand why many SpaceX fans feel the need t
  8. Gotta be able to make those posts about your stonks.
  9. Yes, costs come back down after the initial prototype. Sometimes. But that's not what I said or what @tater was comparing against. The numbers he was showing were powerpoint slide PD numbers. To put it into context, didn't those same ITS slide decks show SpaceX already landing people on Mars by now? (OK, no, I guess they showed SpaceX sending out crews in the next Mars transfer window, so a few years from now.)
  10. So far the record is 1 time. Well yes, it is insane, but not for the reason you suggest. Costs never get cheaper between the PD concept and the final product. Usually what happens is that the weight goes up, the costs go up, and the mission performance gets squeezed.
  11. I used to never wash my track car. It had bits of rubber all over it. I kind of felt like that was sort of earned the hard way. That being said, almost everyone else thought I just never bothered to clean it because I was being lazy about it. And they had a point.
  12. (All this data from Google) A 737 or A320 engine list price is around $13M. Of course, that's list price, not manufacturing cost. Some sources say that customers routinely pay 70% less than list price, or more like $4M/engine. Now, these engines have to run for thousands and thousands of hours, not a few minutes. But still, I hadn't realized that advanced rocket engines are so very much cheaper than even single-aisle airplane engines.
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