Jump to content

Maps of Kerbin?


Recommended Posts

6 minutes ago, AbacusWizard said:

Any planet has only one continent if you lower the sea level enough.

And when you raise it enough you have none? I understand where you're coming from with this statement but technically you're incorrect.
What you're talking about are landmasses, not continents. Continents are determined by tectonic plates. And tectonic plates won't disappear when you raise or lower the water level.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Tex_NL said:

And when you raise it enough you have none? I understand where you're coming from with this statement but technically you're incorrect.
What you're talking about are landmasses, not continents. Continents are determined by tectonic plates. And tectonic plates won't disappear when you raise or lower the water level.

Continents aren't defined by tectonic plates. That would have Siberia be part of North America, a large "continent" that's wholly water in the Pacific, Eurasia all being one thing but India and Arabia being their own separate continents, etc. You might be fine with that, but very few people use continent in a way that means that.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not sure Kerbin has plate tectonics that create continents in the ways we do...come to think of it, there are no volcanoes anywhere in the Kerbol system.

On topic: Kerbal Maps is the best source of...well, Kerbal Maps.

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Findthepin1 said:

What about the tectonic plates themselves? Where do those lie on Kerbin?

We don't know. Maybe there's some way to find out, but I doubt they were programmed into the game

Ooh, maybe you could use the gravity scan or seismograph to find out, or go undersea to try and find mid-ocean ridges

Link to post
Share on other sites

Perhaps it has none. It might be too small. The existence of the really big crater, coinciding with the widespread existence of life, seems to me to be evidence that the geology of the planet hasn't significantly changed for billions of years. For perspective, if Earth's cities were projected onto Kerbin's globe, the crater's width would be comparable to the distance from London to Helsinki, or New Orleans to Toronto. The impact would have killed basically anything bigger than microscopic, assuming life existed at the time. Yet Kerbin is full of life today. That crater, then, has been there for a long enough time that life can become a good-sized biosphere from nothing but microbes (or no life at all). Again, billions of years. So the fact that the crater hasn't been wiped out by plate tectonics in such a long time seems to imply that Kerbin is geologically dead.

Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, Findthepin1 said:

Perhaps it has none. It might be too small. The existence of the really big crater, coinciding with the widespread existence of life, seems to me to be evidence that the geology of the planet hasn't significantly changed for billions of years. For perspective, if Earth's cities were projected onto Kerbin's globe, the crater's width would be comparable to the distance from London to Helsinki, or New Orleans to Toronto. The impact would have killed basically anything bigger than microscopic, assuming life existed at the time. Yet Kerbin is full of life today. That crater, then, has been there for a long enough time that life can become a good-sized biosphere from nothing but microbes (or no life at all). Again, billions of years. So the fact that the crater hasn't been wiped out by plate tectonics in such a long time seems to imply that Kerbin is geologically dead.

I'm thinking that kerbals live underground, and that crater could have been formed like less than twenty years ago. Matter of fact, that could have been the reason Kerbals went to space.

Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, Findthepin1 said:

Perhaps it has none. It might be too small. The existence of the really big crater, coinciding with the widespread existence of life, seems to me to be evidence that the geology of the planet hasn't significantly changed for billions of years. For perspective, if Earth's cities were projected onto Kerbin's globe, the crater's width would be comparable to the distance from London to Helsinki, or New Orleans to Toronto. The impact would have killed basically anything bigger than microscopic, assuming life existed at the time. Yet Kerbin is full of life today. That crater, then, has been there for a long enough time that life can become a good-sized biosphere from nothing but microbes (or no life at all). Again, billions of years. So the fact that the crater hasn't been wiped out by plate tectonics in such a long time seems to imply that Kerbin is geologically dead.

Not necesarilly. If such a meteor were to hit any planet that is geologically active, the plate techtonics of the area it collides with would be intensly altered, and no matter where it lands, even if it is on the corner of seven different plates, all of those under and near the crater would be melted and destroyed, and the most plausible thing is that the area below the crater reformed into a single plate that was probably a bit stronger than others as well due to it all being formed at once at the exact same time, out of the exact same giant slab of igneous and probably metamorphic rock.

Remember, Kerbin has a magnetosphere, as indicated by several science reports, and as such has to be geologically active.

This explination of a new 'asteroid plate' would be the only explination to this day of how it survived. It can also be taken that the small mountain islands around the rim of the crater and the center mountain used to be much larger, much larger for them to not be completely eroded. It can however be assumed that the impact was relatively recent, no more than one billion years would be my guess, because plate techtonics do change over very long periods and those would erode away quite quickly, even if the peaks were extremely wide and taller than any other mountain on Kerbin originally.

Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Findthepin1 said:

There is the issue of life, though. An impact like that would kill just about everything not microscopic. How is Kerbin so filled with life now?

Life comes back really fast. Earth has had several impacts that size, and because of how I explained it, there is a possibility that it has been a while since it hit, which would give time to evolve back

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, nosirrbro said:

Life comes back really fast. Earth has had several impacts that size, and because of how I explained it, there is a possibility that it has been a while since it hit, which would give time to evolve back

Or life actually arrived on that asteroid. Jeb's ancestors riding the ultimate interplanetary transfer vehicle... yeeehaw!

Link to post
Share on other sites
This thread is quite old. Please consider starting a new thread rather than reviving this one.

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...