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Blue Origin Thread (merged)


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Cargo (IDA) breaks free, crushes LOX tank (is it at the top of the stack?). As tank crushes, overpressure, then rupture. RUD/FTS.

That makes too much sense, for it to be a "counterintuitive cause."

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This is not the happy news I was hoping to greet the new day with. Just when you think you've got it figured out, launches are going well and your attention span is starting to skip ahead to the "bonus feature" of first stage recovery - life throws a curve ball to remind you that Space is hard.

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Well I think the faring Failure theory right now holds a lot of water as if you note the video closely that just before breakup the explositon occurs at the top and not the bottom of the vehicle, which does stuggest that the fairing did come undone somehow more than likely due to the aerodynamic stresses on the craft (if you hear the call out on the video the rocket wa moviong at 1Km per second (or 2237 mph) and that that point was traveling at mach 3 when the failure occured..)

again we have to look at the aerodynamic forces here and in fact the interesting thing is that when the rocket goes supersonic you ntice that venting on the port (left0) side of the rocket..(at thi spoint i would say that is where the failure began..)

SO the failue occrred, the capsul did a crash into the lox tank and the end result wa the explsoion you see..

So TOo much stress on a newly redesined fairing (I guess it was to make it Lighter) ended up in costing the craft and all equipment on board..

That' the way I see it.

Space_Coyote

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Elon Musk said there was an apparent overpressure in the upper stage, but that the apparent readings are "counterintuitive." It starts with some apparent venting from the upper part of the craft. It's all on YouTube.

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Failure of both the overpressure valve and failure of a cooling creating a boiloff thus liquid turning to gas that takes up more volume sounds could overpressure without an outside source.

Must be 1.0.4 messing up with the heating. :wink:

Dunno, if that's true I guess that's pretty critical ?

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...launches are going well...

If you don't consider that there have been 3 failures to the ISS only in the past 8 months, then yes, launches are going well. So far, combining all unmanned missions to the ISS in 2014-2015, the success rate is only 80%. Very low for twentieth-century spaceflight standards.

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I was watching this live from the start, looking forwards to a good SpaceX mission and a successful soft landing. It's too bad, this sets back SpaceX, and the members on the ISS do not receive their supplies. I did not watch the press conference, what was it like, to anyone who watched it? Probably a lot more complex than the last. Oh well.

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The following is a statement from NASA Administrator Charles Bolden on the loss Sunday of the SpaceX Commercial Resupply Services 7 (CRS-7) mission.

“We are disappointed in the loss of the latest SpaceX cargo resupply mission to the International Space Station. However, the astronauts are safe aboard the station and have sufficient supplies for the next several months. We will work closely with SpaceX to understand what happened, fix the problem and return to flight. The commercial cargo program was designed to accommodate loss of cargo vehicles. We will continue operation of the station in a safe and effective way as we continue to use it as our test bed for preparing for longer duration missions farther into the solar system.

“A Progress vehicle is ready to launch July 3, followed in August by a Japanese HTV flight. Orbital ATK, our other commercial cargo partner, is moving ahead with plans for its next launch later this year.

“SpaceX has demonstrated extraordinary capabilities in its first six cargo resupply missions to the station, and we know they can replicate that success. We will work with and support SpaceX to assess what happened, understand the specifics of the failure and correct it to move forward. This is a reminder that spaceflight is an incredible challenge, but we learn from each success and each setback. Today's launch attempt will not deter us from our ambitious human spaceflight program.â€Â

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If you don't consider that there have been 3 failures to the ISS only in the past 8 months, then yes, launches are going well. So far, combining all unmanned missions to the ISS in 2014-2015, the success rate is only 80%. Very low for twentieth-century spaceflight standards.

SpaceX launches were going well, that's how I read it. The landing was new and exciting thing, while launching itself had become kind of routine.

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