eddiew

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About eddiew

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    the one with the ears

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  1. Surprised and pleased to discover that hinges can be mapped to steering controls... Certainly makes a trailer behave better than leaving it loose and trying to drag it.
  2. Making good use of Pielab's fuel tanks, the Mundog V makes four consecutive landings in various equatorial craters, netting a healthy set of data for later processing and rotating the crews to ensure the best experience is had by everyone. The final trip is a little tight on fuel margins, leaving barely 100m/s in the tank at the point of docking. We blame Jeb's aggressive piloting style. Back on kerbin, we take the opportunity to test out some new rover parts and spend some time investigating the natural wonders of our own planet. Or at least, investigating that honking fat tree a little to the west of KSC that we've always wondered about. Shortly afterwards, Dunamite's orbit places it in a favourable position to make a daylight descent with LoS communications back home, and the commands are sent to bring it down to ground. The drop is uneventful, Duna's atmosphere proving to be both thin and chilly. More exciting is landing on a 30 degree incline, which causes the lander to have to dynamically adjust the strength of it's leg-springs to try to come to a level seating. Eventually it manages to stop the skid and beams home some interesting data. Seems like Duna would be a nice place to visit but... several of our interns prove to be budding science fiction writers and have been stirring up public interest elsewhere. Warm, humid, sunny - Eve is surely covered in purple rainforests, teeming with exotic and potentially tasty life! Or... well, let's just sit on these temperature and pressure readings for a while before we crush our latest book deal.
  3. Making good use of Pielab's fuel tanks, the Mundog V makes four consecutive landings in various equatorial craters, netting a healthy set of data for later processing and rotating the crews to ensure the best experience is had by everyone. The final trip is a little tight on fuel margins, leaving barely 100m/s in the tank at the point of docking. We blame Jeb's aggressive piloting style. Back on kerbin, we take the opportunity to test out some new rover parts and spend some time investigating the natural wonders of our own planet. Or at least, investigating that honking fat tree a little to the west of KSC that we've always wondered about. Shortly afterwards, Dunamite's orbit places it in a favourable position to make a daylight descent with LoS communications back home, and the commands are sent to bring it down to ground. The drop is uneventful, Duna's atmosphere proving to be both thin and chilly. More exciting is landing on a 30 degree incline, which causes the lander to have to dynamically adjust the strength of it's leg-springs to try to come to a level seating. Eventually it manages to stop the skid and beams home some interesting data. Seems like Duna would be a nice place to visit but... several of our interns prove to be budding science fiction writers and have been stirring up public interest elsewhere. Warm, humid, sunny - Eve is surely covered in purple rainforests, teeming with exotic and potentially tasty life! Or... well, let's just sit on these temperature and pressure readings for a while before we crush our latest book deal.
  4. With a goodly amount of data and samples recovered from Minmus, mission control decides that it might be time to set our sights on other targets. Or, well... one more. The mossy boulders have been preying on everyone's mind, and even though nobody can be bothered going back to tackle them kermanually, the engineering team was able to put together a micro-probe to do the job. Sadly it turns out that the moss is mineral deposits. A lovely green mineral, but only a mineral. An inedible one at that. Following on from this tiny lander, we send another tiny lander to another planet entirely; Dunamite enters Dunan orbit. Leaving it's relay stage at high altitude with barely a whiff of fumes left in the tank, the little probe drops to a lower orbit and prepares for descent. Meanwhile back on kerbin, our engineers have discovered a powerful new way of fitting bulky objects into rocket fairings. They tell us these strange devices are called 'hinges' and they will soon solve all our problems. Mission control remains sceptical but open-minded. Yet another instalment of the Mundog series is launched, first saying a quick hello to Pielab in LKO because apparently the newspapers thought that would be cool, and then swiftly heading for Mun itself. The original plan had been to send a fuel delivery to Pielab Station once it reached munar orbit, but since the ascent stage turned out to be a viable transfer stage, a robotic fuel tanker was instead dispatched to refuel it. No sense sending additional fuel cans when there are already some attached. Once both Pielab and Mundog V were in position, the lander made a brief but fruitful descent into the Mun's Twin Craters biome, setting up a surface experiment package and gathering useful data for return to the station.
  5. With a goodly amount of data and samples recovered from Minmus, mission control decides that it might be time to set our sights on other targets. Or, well... one more. The mossy boulders have been preying on everyone's mind, and even though nobody can be bothered going back to tackle them kermanually, the engineering team was able to put together a micro-probe to do the job. Sadly it turns out that the moss is mineral deposits. A lovely green mineral, but only a mineral. An inedible one at that. Following on from this tiny lander, we send another tiny lander to another planet entirely; Dunamite enters Dunan orbit. Leaving it's relay stage at high altitude with barely a whiff of fumes left in the tank, the little probe drops to a lower orbit and prepares for descent. Meanwhile back on kerbin, our engineers have discovered a powerful new way of fitting bulky objects into rocket fairings. They tell us these strange devices are called 'hinges' and they will soon solve all our problems. (To be honest, the new robotic parts aren't exactly perfect. The arms really didn't want to deploy symmetrically, and a lot of manual toggling of autostruts was required before they finally locked straight. I'd sort of hoped this sort of thing would have been polished out by now, but ok, we'll work with it. It seems like there are workarounds and fiddles to get things to behave properly if you're patient.) Yet another instalment of the Mundog series is launched, first saying a quick hello to Pielab in LKO because apparently the newspapers thought that would be cool, and then swiftly heading for Mun itself. The original plan had been to send a fuel delivery to Pielab Station once it reached munar orbit, but since the ascent stage turned out to be a viable transfer stage, a robotic fuel tanker was instead dispatched to refuel it. No sense sending additional fuel cans when there are already some attached. Once both Pielab and Mundog V were in position, the lander made a brief but fruitful descent into the Mun's Twin Craters biome, setting up a surface experiment package and gathering useful data for return to the station. (While I have historically tended to tap every biome on every body, I'm not going to be doing that with this career. My tech tree is much simpler, and I just don't need to be maximising my science returns. Current plans are to land in the major craters that fall under Pielab's equatorial orbit.)
  6. I'm about to launch the Pielab space station... You... you rang?
  7. As Vanamonde says, we can't help without screenshots. Too many billions of configurations of spaceplanes that might maybe not be quite right yet still kind of fly to some degree. General thoughts after seeing many many people asking why their planes fail: - Instability happens because the CoM is too close to the CoL, sometimes happening as fuel drains. Some people seem to think the CoM and CoL should be aligned; no. No. That is exactly how to MAKE a plane unstable. You do it for fighter jets, not for anything you want to be able to take your hand off the stick. - Some people seem to like to fly planes without a vertical tailfin... don't be doing that unless you want flat spins. - If you're stuck in the atmosphere for a very long time, maybe you just don't have enough thrust and need more jet engines. Or maybe you need more lifting surfaces because you''re having to pull back 30 degrees to stay level. Again, pictures are vital to getting help with your specific plane. - Delta wings with no canards. These planes are usually heavy at the back, then people put the control surfaces half a metre behind the CoM and wonder why they have no pitch control. Got to give them some leverage and have a good distance between the control surfaces and the CoM.
  8. Been running a modded 1.8.x for a few days now; no crashes, just one occasion where the music started in the VAB despite being muted. Minorly annoying, but nothing critical. I prefer it to the old "ram limit countdown" we had before 64-bit came along and there was a 100% guarantee of a crash when the game hit a certain memory footprint Haven't tried 'do not show' feature, cannot comment on that, but on the whole this is a pretty respectable version from my perspective.
  9. It's different, but it's still has the feel of kerbals... I'd support the slightly less head-heavy version
  10. After poring over the results of Jeb's last mission to Minmus, R&D finally raise their heads and present a new blueprint for a 2-kerman lander - which engineering immediately uses to send Jeb right back to where he was, this time with backup. With Bill 'assisting', the 'broken' experiment package is soon restored to working condition, and begins its slow observations of our mystery goo unit. With plenty of fuel still in the tank, mission control gives the mod for a short hop to a nearby biome, wherein Bill begins setting out a secondary set of instruments. We're not entirely sure if this gains us anything, but it doesn't seem to hurt either. Jeb, naturally, lost patience after 4.72 seconds and jetted away to investigate the 'weird thing' he had spotted on the way over - but since he doesn't believe in the right tool for the right job, he naturally had no tools at all and was unable to do anything about it when he found it. Return and re-entry went smoothly, although there was a brief brown-trousers moment when the ejected fuel stage decided it was less aerodynamic than the pod, and went shooting back past the windows before finally exploding somewhere in the darkness behind. This unscheduled re-visitation of Minmus somehow nets another 300 data points, allowing R&D to come up with a blueprint for a 3-kerman crew capsule. The engineers quickly swipe it and run away into their hut with a thermos of tea and several packs of chocolate hob nobs. We will report back once they emerge. -- some days later -- The engineering team proposes an even larger, bolder vessel, one that will carry not only 3 crew, but a more comprehensive science package. Seeing as we've received a distress call from one of those cheap knock-off space programs, we decide to head back to Minmus and give it a darn good scienceing. Between them, Val, Bob and new recruit Yuki manage to tap up five biomes, gathering surface samples and collecting data from the premium materials experiment. While Bob did spot and investigate one of the 'mossy boulders' as reported by Jeb, he too failed to make sense of it with the tools he had at his disposal. Evidently we are going to have to come up with something more advanced if we want to learn about these mysterious structures. Happily, the team came back with over 1300 data points, which should help a lot with that!
  11. With the success of Mundog IV, the R&D team find themselves in a good position to propose an even larger, bolder vessel, one that will carry not only 3 crew, but a more comprehensive science package. Seeing as we've received a distress call from one of those cheap knock-off space programs, we decide to head back to Minmus and give it a darn good scienceing. Between them, Val, Bob and new recruit Yuki manage to tap up five biomes, gathering surface samples and collecting data from the premium materials experiment. While Bob did spot and investigate one of the 'mossy boulders' as reported by Jeb, he too failed to make sense of it with the tools he had at his disposal. Evidently we are going to have to come up with something more advanced if we want to learn about these mysterious structures. Happily, the team came back with over 1300 data points, which should help a lot with that!
  12. Impressed you made it! I had some crew reports between 5400 and 5700m, and the darn thing kept hitting terrain after a few orbits... Eventually I developed a suborbital-dive strategy. (Amusingly, one of the impacts was such a glacing blow that even at orbital speeds, only one antenna broke off and the rest of the vessel pinged away into space.)
  13. After poring over the results of Jeb's last mission to Minmus, R&D finally raise their heads and present a new blueprint for a 2-kerman lander - which engineering immediately uses to send Jeb right back to where he was, this time with backup. With Bill 'assisting', the 'broken' experiment package is soon restored to working condition, and begins its slow observations of our mystery goo unit. With plenty of fuel still in the tank, mission control gives the mod for a short hop to a nearby biome, wherein Bill begins setting out a secondary set of instruments. We're not entirely sure if this gains us anything, but it doesn't seem to hurt either. Jeb, naturally, lost patience after 4.72 seconds and jetted away to investigate the 'weird thing' he had spotted on the way over - but since he doesn't believe in the right tool for the right job, he naturally had no tools at all and was unable to do anything about it when he found it. Return and re-entry went smoothly, although there was a brief brown-trousers moment when the ejected fuel stage decided it was less aerodynamic than the pod, and went shooting back past the windows before finally exploding somewhere in the darkness behind. This unscheduled re-visitation of Minmus somehow nets another 300 data points, allowing R&D to come up with a blueprint for a 3-kerman crew capsule. The engineers quickly swipe it and run away into their hut with a thermos of tea and several packs of chocolate hob nobs. We will report back once they emerge.
  14. What level IS your tracking station? I would be suspicious if you have never upgraded it at all. There are no other factors that I know of that would affect visibility of orbit lines, including various antennae configs. It's not on the vessel, it's on your ground facilities.
  15. *heavy breathing* So looking forward to wider mod support for 1.8... maybe this time I can start a planet pack at a point in time when it's more than 2 months to the next big thing that will make everything stop working