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sh1pman

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  1. If I were writing a grant proposal for such a study, I’d ask for more money for more launches because one repeat is not enough for a convincing statistical analysis.
  2. It’s ok if countries do their military stuff there, but in a way that doesn’t fill the orbit with deadly shrapnel that endangers everything, including people. (e.g. X-37B and Russian inspector satellites didn’t generate nearly as much condemnation). Similarly, nuclear tests were banned because they produced fallout and raised the amount of radioactive isotopes like 14C in the atmosphere.
  3. “You see Ivan, old defunct Soviet satellites are not always in reasonable orbits, and this is life. Key to start.” I think you overcomplicate things, making them look far more cunning than they actually are. I’m 99% sure that space debris is just not an issue for MoD unless it endangers their own assets, which ISS isn’t.
  4. What I’d really love to see is a Peresvet laser gun vs. satellite test. Melting a sat is better than blowing it up into a thousand pieces! Because the 40k-style Main Cathedral of the Armed Forces needs to be protected with anti-orbital laser batteries.
  5. Roscosmos most likely knew, but couldn’t do anything about it. They have no authority over MoD, and the launch was from the army base nearby to Plesetsk, not the cosmodrome itself.
  6. Of course, but I was responding to the part about “weaselling out of ISS”. If the MoD says there’s no danger, Roscosmos can’t use the debris danger as an argument in favor of withdrawal from the program.
  7. Maybe, but no tracked pieces have such tracks yet, as far as I know. According to the press release by Russia MoD, the lowest-reaching debris are 40 km above ISS altitude. If this was intended as a way to weasel out of ISS, looks like they failed
  8. One full Starship tanker. Not ASAP, debris will still need several years to reach as low as ISS orbit.
  9. @DDE saw that. Even with tons of broken sats available, I still like my idea with Progress more
  10. So they still need to test MiG-31 missile vs. satellite and a “Peresvet” laser gun vs. satellite. I guess, filling orbit with shrapnel is a way to defend against FOBS. I think the best way to do the test and not anger anyone is to blow up a Progress after it finishes its stay on the station. Undock, lower the orbit to 200x200 km, fire the missile. Lowest risk of getting a debris that can hit the station or anything useful.
  11. What's the difference? Are the other objects trackable but unidentified, what does that mean?
  12. From MoD statement: Maybe they know something and don’t tell.
  13. I think it’s a good possibility. A test to make sure they can intercept a FOBS while it’s in orbit.
  14. Probably because they needed to do a live test of Nudol, and potential debris were of little importance to people who run ASAT development. But on the bright side, as we can clearly see, the test was successful. So no new tests are needed, right?
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