Question

Recommended Posts

  • 0
58 minutes ago, Spricigo said:

Inb4 demands for En-Sc and similar kinds of British.

KSP in Scots would be amazing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

God, I hope not. Though we look fondly upon our brethren across the pond (especially those on the much more beautiful island next door), let us not forget that we fought a war to free ourselves from English food and words like "rubbish". Let's all just speak American, please. We don't need any unnecessary U's around here. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
51 minutes ago, Cpt Kerbalkrunch said:

Let's all just speak American, please. 

As long is the kind of American used there on Southern Brazil, I'm all for that idea.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
1 hour ago, Cpt Kerbalkrunch said:

God, I hope not. Though we look fondly upon our brethren across the pond (especially those on the much more beautiful island next door), let us not forget that we fought a war to free ourselves from English food and words like "rubbish". Let's all just speak American, please. We don't need any unnecessary U's around here. :)

Long live the Queen! And all those U's are necessary, without them the words look really weird. Besides EN-CA/FR-CA should be the next localization... Eh?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

I read somewhere we could write a simple plugin that sets the language string, and then we could write a dictionary for that language string. Sadly the 1.2.9 dev thread is no longer visible and I can't find the post that explains how to do that.

I suppose one could swipe code from the community localization project and make a plugin based on that. Or maybe you can take the pre-compiled plugin, and just edit settings.cfg to use a valid language string such as en-gb (or en-ca - I really want to do that one!) and then make a dictionary for it.

Quote

Besides EN-CA/FR-CA should be the next localization... Eh?

 

Edited by Gordon Fecyk
Eh?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
2 hours ago, Gordon Fecyk said:

I read somewhere we could write a simple plugin that sets the language string, and then we could write a dictionary for that language string. Sadly the 1.2.9 dev thread is no longer visible and I can't find the post that explains how to do that.

I'll poke around and see if I can find that for you.

But note that there are a bit over 8000 strings to localize in the dictionary -- so it's a bit of effort, if only to translate from American into British or Canuck or Strine, or whatever.

(And yes, I agree that Scots would be awesome. :) )

 

Edited by bewing

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
50 minutes ago, bewing said:

I'll poke around and see if I can find that for you

Thanks for taking a look.

I still have my spreadsheet copy from the community localization project. They might not have appreciated the attempt, but I had a pretty complete en-ca dictionary that just needed a plugin to turn it on. And no, I didn't add eh? to every word sentence. :sticktongue:

Edited by Gordon Fecyk
like eh? who eh? adds eh? to every word, eh?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

You should put it everywhere that's appropriate. Part of the point of KSP is that it's supposed to be funny. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Well, as I understand it, all the info about localization is completely unhidden.

The official stuff is in the Modder's Notes: 

 

The forum thread about it all is here (and it's big): 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

+1

I want my Kerbals strapped into their seats munching crisps not goddamned (potato) chips,  that's just dumb in a capsule with no fryer in sight.

For the terminally uncultured,  chips are the fast food  consisting of mushy deep fried potato slices coated in grease  and shards of batter.    The are consumed with enough salt to raise your systolic over the chamber pressure of an RD-180,  and the sort of industrial strength vinegar that could be used as monopropellant.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

I still wonder why it's not en_EN ( or just plain EN ). It's not like English is the language of England or anything :P

gd_AL & gd_CY ( gaelic Alba/Cymru ) would be the sensible codes for Scotland/Wales national languages - Scottish appears to be gd_GB - I'm very sure the other celtic areas of GB don't speak Scottish Gaelic - and Welsh just CY though if someone wants to get started on those. While you're at it, add Cornish & Bretannic too.

Edited by Van Disaster

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
1 hour ago, AeroGav said:

+1

I want my Kerbals strapped into their seats munching crisps not goddamned (potato) chips,  that's just dumb in a capsule with no fryer in sight.

For the terminally uncultured,  chips are the fast food  consisting of mushy deep fried potato slices coated in grease  and shards of batter.    The are consumed with enough salt to raise your systolic over the chamber pressure of an RD-180,  and the sort of industrial strength vinegar that could be used as monopropellant.   

Your Kerbals will be glad for that salt upon splashdown. It's known to make one quite buoyant.

And really, "crisps"? I think it's very clear that, were it not for radio, then television, and (especially) now the internet, by this time English and American would be 2 distinctly different languages akin to Spanish and Portuguese.

I really do enjoy hearing it, though. Things like "are you havin' a laugh?" and "innit" are quite charming to us and always produce a smile. And I'm a definite fan of  your vulgarities, which I obviously can't repeat here. God save the internet!

Edited by Cpt Kerbalkrunch

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
12 hours ago, Cpt Kerbalkrunch said:

God, I hope not. Thogh we look fondly 'pon our brethren across the pond (especially those on the moch more beatifol island next door), let's not forget that we foght a war to free orselves from English food and words like "rubbish". Let's all just speak American, please. We don't need any nnecessary U's arond here. :)

Fixed that for yo.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
30 minutes ago, Van Disaster said:

I still wonder why it's not en_EN ( or just plain EN ). It's not like English is the language of England or anything :P

gd_AL & gd_CY ( gaelic Alba/Cymru ) would be the sensible codes for Scotland/Wales national languages - Scottish appears to be gd_GB - I'm very sure the other celtic areas of GB don't speak Scottish Gaelic - and Welsh just CY though if someone wants to get started on those. While you're at it, add Cornish & Bretannic too.

I don’t think the text boxes would be big enough for Welsh :D

 

Crisps is obviously the right word to use, they are crispy SLICES of potato, chips of potato are much bigger as you could never chip something into a thin slice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
56 minutes ago, Cpt Kerbalkrunch said:

I think it's very clear that, were it not for radio, then television, and (especially) now the internet, by this time English and American would be 2 distinctly different languages akin to Spanish and Portuguese.

That Impression fit a typical Unitestadian stereotype: too self-centered to notice how diverse the rest of the world is.

English and American akin to Portuguese and Brazilian or Spanish and Mexican. 

Portuguese vs Spanish? Comparable to English vs Deutsch or Chinese vs Japanese maybe. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
14 hours ago, Gaarst said:

KSP in Scots would be amazing.

Do we get popups saying "the engines cannae take anymore"?  I need those popups.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
1 hour ago, Oiff said:

I don’t think the text boxes would be big enough for Welsh :D

If it can handle German, I'm sure it'll manage :P

A Welsh voicepack would be kinda fun.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
51 minutes ago, Spricigo said:

 too self-centered to notice how diverse the rest of the world is.

Of course. We just call it being American. :)

 

To be a bit more serious though, I was using exaggeration and (hopefully) humor to show that 2 cultures that were once one and the same have become so much different from one another. My first thought was to say English to German (or Deutsche, if you prefer :)), but I thought that might be a bit too ancient for the connection to be as relevant.

Edited by Cpt Kerbalkrunch

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
1 hour ago, Cpt Kerbalkrunch said:

Of course. We just call it being American. :)

MUR-I-CA!

It's tough being the leader of the free world, but we manage.

You can all thank us when it's convenient for you. :wink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Uh oh... this is diverging into angry politics. Can we step back for a moment and return to the original question of adding languages? Even if they happen to be variations of English?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Oddly enough many of the differences between US English and UK English are where UK English has changed over the years rather than the US English having changed.

There was however the aborted attempt to simplify US English at the start of the last century, it didn’t last very long and seemed to just create a lot of people who can’t spell.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
17 minutes ago, Gordon Fecyk said:

Uh oh... this is diverging into angry politics. Can we step back for a moment and return to the original question of adding languages? Even if they happen to be variations of English?

Hope no one took it that way. I thought we were being funny. This ain't America circa 1825. We dig the Brits. There's a reason why no one on Game of Thrones has an American accent.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
5 minutes ago, Oiff said:

Oddly enough many of the differences between US English and UK English are where UK English has changed over the years rather than the US English having changed.

I think that's true of rhoticity, in which it became common for Brits to imitate the most posh-sounding accents.

5 minutes ago, Oiff said:

There was however the aborted attempt to simplify US English at the start of the last century, it didn’t last very long and seemed to just create a lot of people who can’t spell.

Not so aborted, depending on which century you mean by "last"; many US conventions go back to Noah Webster:

https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/A_Compendious_Dictionary_of_the_English_Language

Quote

For a like reason, as well as to purify our orthography from corruptions and restore to words their genuine spelling, we ought to reject u from honor, favor, candor, error, and others of this class. Under the Norman princes, when every effort of royal authority was exerted to crush the Saxons and obliterate their language, the Norman French was the only language of the English courts and legal proceedings, and the Latin words which, at that period, were introduced into use in England, came clothed with the French livery. At the same time, to preserve a trace of their originals, the o of the Latin honor, as well as the u of the French honeur was retained in the terminating syllable. Hence for some centuries, our language was disfigured with a class of mongrels, splendour, inferiour, superiour, authour, and the like, which are neither Latin nor French, nor calculated to exhibit the English pronunciation. Johnson, in reverence to usage, retained this vitious orthography, without regarding the palpable absurdity of inserting u in primitive words, when it must be omitted in the derivatives, superiority, inferiority and the like; for no person ever wrote superiourity, inferiourity. A sense of propriety however, has nearly triumphed over these errors; and our best writers have almost unanimously rejected the from this whole class of words, except perhaps ten or twelve. From these also Ash has very consistently rejected u, restoring the purity of the original orthography.

(I don't think I've ever seen "errour" in print.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This thread is quite old. Please consider starting a new thread rather than reviving this one.

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Answer this question...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.