ProtoJeb21

EPIC 203533312 - The Most HORRIFIC System in the Universe

Recommended Posts

1 hour ago, Vanamonde said:

I have a question for some of the actual physicists here. 

This arrangement can't be stable, right? The planet would be orbiting faster than the star is rotating, and if it's that close, wouldn't it be sweeping up and accumulating matter from the star? Solar wind, at the very least, if not actual contact. Wouldn't the planet be getting more massive, and therefore spiraling in? Granted, there's quite a bit of angular momentum in an orbiting planet, and the rate of accumulation relative to the overall mass of the planet might be small, but over astronomical timescales, it can't last forever. 

Or conversely, is the planet being seared so intensely that it's losing mass like a comet, and therefore gradually getting farther away? 

And how did it get there in the first place? 

Tartarus is most definitely on its way to crashing into its star. Numerous other planets have been found in similar orbital situations, from Hot Jupiters like WASP-12b, to teensy rocky worlds like KOI-1843.03. However, Tartarus is far denser and more metal-rich than any of these examples. The most likely explanation is that a large gas giant with an enormous core (50-250 Me) migrated incredibly close to its star, had its atmosphere ripped away, and became Tartarus as it continued to spiral closer to its star. What we're most likely looking at is the end of a planet's journey from the cold region of its formation to the fiery apocalypse of its destruction. I estimate less than 500,000 to 1 million years are left - likely even less - before it collides with the star. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, ProtoJeb21 said:

This arrangement can't be stable, right? The planet would be orbiting faster than the star is rotating, and if it's that close, wouldn't it be sweeping up and accumulating matter from the star? Solar wind, at the very least, if not actual contact. Wouldn't the planet be getting more massive, and therefore spiraling in?

I'm not an astrophysicist (nor do I play one on TV), but the u wouldn't change as the satellite draws mass from the parent. m1M2 would still remain constant, so Vorb would remain constant. The barycenter would just shift closer to the satellite. What would cause the satellite to slow would be drag.

*Edit* scratch that. Mu would actually slowly increase to a maximum where m1=m2, then decrease again. /AlgebraFail

Best,
-Slashy

Edited by GoSlash27

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, ProtoJeb21 said:

Tartarus is most definitely on its way to crashing into its star. Numerous other planets have been found in similar orbital situations, from Hot Jupiters like WASP-12b, to teensy rocky worlds like KOI-1843.03. However, Tartarus is far denser and more metal-rich than any of these examples. The most likely explanation is that a large gas giant with an enormous core (50-250 Me) migrated incredibly close to its star, had its atmosphere ripped away, and became Tartarus as it continued to spiral closer to its star. What we're most likely looking at is the end of a planet's journey from the cold region of its formation to the fiery apocalypse of its destruction. I estimate less than 500,000 to 1 million years are left - likely even less - before it collides with the star. 

Depending on the wavelength of the star and how much light it emits the orbiting planet would not be able to retain heavier elements. Hydrogen, for instance has an adsorption spectrum in the near UV/UV range, this kicks electrons from the s orbital to higher orbitals where they are easily stripped away. If that happens hydrogen fluffs up because of charge repulsion and eventually the protons would be carried into spac. Mercury Shows what happens, the hydrogen can congeal with other elements and condense on the sides of craters, but as soon as the sun shines on they surfaces the material is blown into space. The difference between mercury and venus is that venus is massive enough and far away enough that it can retain sulfur oxides and carbon oxides, nitrogen but not water or elemental hydrogen. Mercury is so hot it cannot even retain sulfur oxides. At the other end of the solar system pluto is so cold it captures water, reactive protons, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, oxygen and transiently elemental hydrogen.

A very hot blue star could conceivably steal all the gas off of a brown dwarf leaving only a small planet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Vanamonde said:

I have a question for some of the actual physicists here. 

This arrangement can't be stable, right? The planet would be orbiting faster than the star is rotating, and if it's that close, wouldn't it be sweeping up and accumulating matter from the star? Solar wind, at the very least, if not actual contact. Wouldn't the planet be getting more massive, and therefore spiraling in? Granted, there's quite a bit of angular momentum in an orbiting planet, and the rate of accumulation relative to the overall mass of the planet might be small, but over astronomical timescales, it can't last forever. 

Or conversely, is the planet being seared so intensely that it's losing mass like a comet, and therefore gradually getting farther away? 

And how did it get there in the first place? 

It's Simple; Someone left the oven on, and the propulsion from the oven top flames over billions of years pushed it closer, causing this affect.[jk]
Honestly, like Proto said, Tartatus spirals inward from gaining mass and then loosing it. it probably creates interesting skies, with plasma glowing in giant waves across the sky, dipping onto the planet and leaving. it would likely heat the planet much more, as essentially, the star is landing on the planet. great star mining location however.
 

Wait...
...
WE FORGOT ABOUT THE CORONA @ProtoJeb21!

Edited by Cabbink

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

also to top things off, jupiter's core is a mass of 14 to 18 earths, or 5% of it's mass. if we assume tartarus is a jupiter core of equal ratio, the mass of such a previous object would be 4000 Earths. thats 12.7 Jupiters. this means the planet was just light enough to not be considered a brown dwarf. with presure like that and high metalicity, it likely caused lots of pressure, and may have temporarily fused materials, however unlikely.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Vanamonde said:

I have a question for some of the actual physicists here. 

This arrangement can't be stable, right? The planet would be orbiting faster than the star is rotating, and if it's that close, wouldn't it be sweeping up and accumulating matter from the star? Solar wind, at the very least, if not actual contact. Wouldn't the planet be getting more massive, and therefore spiraling in? Granted, there's quite a bit of angular momentum in an orbiting planet, and the rate of accumulation relative to the overall mass of the planet might be small, but over astronomical timescales, it can't last forever. 

Or conversely, is the planet being seared so intensely that it's losing mass like a comet, and therefore gradually getting farther away? 

And how did it get there in the first place? 

I am not a physicist. But if i interpret the scarce information on EPIC 203533312 right the above has yet to be confirmed as a planet.

Edit: If it is confirmed as a planet it first and foremost would have to have a certain density in order to stay above the roche limit and not being torn by tidal forces.

Edited by Green Baron

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 14/11/2017 at 6:42 PM, ProtoJeb21 said:

Apparently, it seems more likely that Kraken is an actual planet...and it is freaking horrific. 

https://arxiv.org/pdf/1603.06488.pdf

From the linked text:

"The remaining three taregets, EPIC 202094740, 203533312 and 212150006, are prime targets for follow-up, even though they have strong a priori odds of being false positives (see Col ́on et al. 2015)"

and

"Six of our candidates have radius values of > 3R⊕ (202094740, 201637175, 203533312, 210605073, 211995325, and 212150006). It is entirely possible that some or perhaps all are false positives."

 

Just sayin'. It might be too early ...

Edited by Green Baron

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Green Baron said:

From the linked text:

"The remaining three taregets, EPIC 202094740, 203533312 and 212150006, are prime targets for follow-up, even though they have strong a priori odds of being false positives (see Col ́on et al. 2015)"

and

"Six of our candidates have radius values of > 3R⊕ (202094740, 201637175, 203533312, 210605073, 211995325, and 212150006). It is entirely possible that some or perhaps all are false positives."

 

Just sayin'. It might be too early ...

Yeah, there is a pretty good chance of Tartarus being the incredibly dangerous eclipsing binary system I described before, and I am very open to the possibility of this still being true. However, compared to some of the other Sub-Jovian candidates in the study, Tartarus has more evidence supporting its existence as a planet. Two of the SJCs have radial velocity data showing they are EBs, and one of them transits only half the time and seems to be a disintegrating comet. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So what is the atmosphere most likely made of? Heavy materials like osmium or lighter metals?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Cabbink said:

So what is the atmosphere most likely made of? Heavy materials like osmium or lighter metals?

Probably. It seems likely that molecules won't be able to form in such a hot environment. Rather, it would be made of vaporized rocks broken down into their individual atoms and ionized by stellar radiation. So, essentially, Rock Plasma. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, ProtoJeb21 said:

Probably. It seems likely that molecules won't be able to form in such a hot environment. Rather, it would be made of vaporized rocks broken down into their individual atoms and ionized by stellar radiation. So, essentially, Rock Plasma. 

Do i assume the crusshing power is in the giga(?) Pascals. Would this mean we could have wierd forms of metals?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Cabbink said:

Do i assume the crusshing power is in the giga(?) Pascals. Would this mean we could have wierd forms of metals?

I honestly don't know :/. The environment on Tartarus challenges much of what is known about chemistry, due to the high temperatures and likely high-pressure atmosphere. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Will Tartarus actually collide with the star, or will it just kind of melt and disintegrate? :confused:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now