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Shower thoughts


p1t1o

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11 hours ago, kerbiloid said:

It's a plane tail brake. Use it to land on a roof.

("Or on a carrier...")

"Egad!  By the holy chilblains of Jove's kerbiloid arthritis!!"  That's it!

It's an e.g. P3 Orion carrier-landing RACL (Rocket-Assisted Carrier Landing)!?

300px-P-3c_03l_(modified).jpg

I used 4x Sepatrons on my 2021 Martin 'Top Deck' with a solid fuel supply on a carrier to recharge those retros for Navy 'catch and release' training programs.

The Navy canceled the program when Admiral Chad Gaskerman @chadgaskerman torpedoed it -- reason: Seps have puny thrust (18 kN) and a long burn (5s).

Whereas, a baby like this, eh, 'Launch Escape System'[1] delivers 750 kN for 0.5 seconds and that burn could be down-rated, tailored individually to suit most kinds of carrier craft.

Fly approximately down the deck, 2m above it, and punch the STOP! button to drop the Lamborghini into the 'park' like a valet at a 4-star restaurant.  Yowser, I like it.

Spoiler

[1] Why the funny name, though: 'Launch Escape System'?  And not with the other 'solid fuel boosters'?  I hadn't paid much attention to that...

Methinks I should shower more often.

Edited by Hotel26
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On 8/29/2023 at 5:04 AM, ColdJ said:

Things with tails generally don't sit on their buttocks, so if we did have tails, would we constantly get numb tails and pins and needles tails as the circulation comes back?

An baboon relaxing, without any problems with the tail, they even sit like us.
PAFF_012617_Guineababoon-1024x682.jpg
With an chair it would be much less an issue  as the tail would simple go out the back. I assume even sofas would have an split at the back. 

And you get this stupidity, this is an Argonian and Elder scroll race here in Elder scrolls online an MMO I plays most days. 
Note the thick and pretty stiff tail. He is the guy the the left the other is an summoned per :) 
d7e8dgh-8353f65e-8536-4e65-90ab-58acbe69
This is an Argonian chair
Argonian-Chair-Woven.jpg?resize=403,700

The ones designing the chairs read the cultural references and overall style guides but did not look at a Argonian. 
At least the Khajiit has sensible chairs for their cat like tails. 
/of topic rant 

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11 hours ago, magnemoe said:

An baboon relaxing, without any problems with the tail, they even sit like us.

Have you googled the images of "baboon buttocks"?

This monkey is just born for an office, but should we have the same?

Edited by kerbiloid
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2 hours ago, kerbiloid said:

Have you googled the images of "baboon buttocks"?

This monkey is just born for an office, but should we have the same?

I have, pretty gross I say. 
And no if we had tails it would likely be an short useless one, but sitting is not an problem. 

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Indium is named after the bright indigo line in its spectrum. The Japanese discovered that cotton was a difficult fabric to dye, except with indigo. So, indigo dye was widely used to colour cotton throughout the Edo period (1603–1867).

Most indium is used to make indium tin oxide (ITO), which is an important part of touch screens, flatscreen TVs and solar panels. This is because it conducts electricity, bonds strongly to glass and is transparent.
 
Indium nitride, phosphide and antimonide are semiconductors used in transistors and microchips.
 
Indium metal sticks to glass and can be used to give a mirror finish to windows of tall buildings, and as a protective film on welders’ goggles. It has also been used to coat ball bearings in Formula 1 racing cars because of its low friction.
 
An indium alloy has been used for fire-sprinkler systems in shops and warehouses because of its low melting point.
 
So I am guessing that it will not be changed. :)
 
So if California had a name change, would it affect the periodic table?
Also would the "Red Hot Chilli Peppers" have to change their song "Californication"?
Edited by ColdJ
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3 hours ago, ColdJ said:

Indium is named after the bright indigo line in its spectrum. The Japanese discovered that cotton was a difficult fabric to dye, except with indigo. So, indigo dye was widely used to colour cotton throughout the Edo period (1603–1867).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indigo

Quote

The word "indigo" comes from the Latin word indicum, meaning "Indian", as the plant-based dye was originally exported to Europe from India.

So, the color name is getting obsolete, too.

 

3 hours ago, ColdJ said:
So if California had a name change, would it affect the periodic table?
Also would the "Red Hot Chilli Peppers" have to change their song "Californication"?

Of course, you are aware that the Cf was publicly considered inappropriate for usage in nukes due to its high radioactivity, which would make a californium bullet get red hot and melt down.

So, it's named exactly after that song.
(Though, I'm not sure what is Chili doing with that.)

P.S.
Btw, interesting, how will the Columbus story now sound?

"Columbus was erroneously thinking that he had reached Bharat, so he called the local people Indians."

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So, I am in the shower (hypothetically).  And I'm a busy man so I don't get a lot of time to shower; thus I do like to use that time proactively.

And I was thinking what a lot of time wastage in this thing, Elcano Challenge, so most naturally, I'm thinking, "how to save time (& cut costs)?".

I attach below what I came up with.  And I admit I haven't been paying attention in all the years (and iterations) this thing has been running...  so this may not be an original idea.  [But I will be the first to patent it!]

After all, most people waste a lot more time in the shower than I do!  Easy to outclass me on innovation...

The first key to it is that it begins at the North pole, visits the South pole and returns to the South pole.  Circumnav 101...

The second key to it is that it takes the flattest (fastest) route.  It also has the advantage that it minimizes the time-wasting distractions of e.g. scenery.

Just two kinds of scenery, in fact: water and frozen water.  So, one kind, really.  (Maybe a coupla hundred kilometers of frozen green H2O, if you wish to be finnicky.)

Spoiler

sjh8M9m.jpg

The vehicle to be used would be designed for very high speed on ice.  And high speed on water.  (Maybe Sea Spray III?)

I thought it might have to have chutes on it to dismount the polar caps.  Ah yes, it would have to.  Leaving the southern cap.

I think a direct, free fall (no wings or other exploits) -- well, OK, I might be going very fast at the time the cap self-terminated -- would not invalidate the rules, or at least the spirit -- of the challenge?

(OK, see: "Brief jumps over dunes and such are permitted".)

Seems, too, like this expedition could depart southward from KSC and return to KSC (from the north and around the southerly cape) with little additional expense.

Still seems like a huge waste of time.  I think I would have to pay a flunky to do it for me.  (I know.  I'll have my assistant call Greta Kerman and see if she's available...)

After all, Big Business is pretty brisk right now!

And Time, as you no doubt know, is Money!

Edited by Hotel26
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Interesting fact: a standard horse (rear part) has a width which is accurately matching a half of a standard railroad gauge (4' 8.5" for most of Western countries).

As a result, it perfectly matches the standard width of a Space Shuttle payload bay.

This is a perfect evidence that the horse dimensions are't random or custom, like the darwinists say.
The horses have been created in strict accordance with then-future industrial standards, and this totally disproves the evolution theory.

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5 hours ago, kerbiloid said:

Interesting fact: a standard horse (rear part) has a width which is accurately matching a half of a standard railroad gauge (4' 8.5" for most of Western countries).

As a result, it perfectly matches the standard width of a Space Shuttle payload bay.

This is a perfect evidence that the horse dimensions are't random or custom, like the darwinists say.
The horses have been created in strict accordance with then-future industrial standards, and this totally disproves the evolution theory.

The old trope. But you can not put horses so close together, you need an center bar and some slack so add 20-30 cm. Also train cars is much wider than the track as in 3.5 meter is standard. 
Add  the large draft horses at 1900 was twice as heavy or more compared to your general riding and cart horse. 
And the connection to the space shuttle is the maximum gauge on an railway as in how wide your cargo can be. Around 3.5 meter who is the width of the shuttle boosters, most tanks and falcon 9 even if its not transported by rails 
3.5 meters is still the limit for oversize load who just need oversize load trailing cars on an highway. Larger and you might have to close down lines 
 

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20 minutes ago, magnemoe said:

But you can not put horses so close together, you need an center bar and some slack so add 20-30 cm.

Yes, the gaps were included in standard from the very beginning. 

Not exactly Roman, but still good.

https://files.stroyinf.ru/Data2/1/4294839/4294839586.htm

20 minutes ago, magnemoe said:

Also train cars is much wider than the track as in 3.5 meter is standard. 

The train car (~3.25 m or so) is a platform width for standard rail gauge.

ISO-container width is defined by the train car dimensions.

20 minutes ago, magnemoe said:

Add  the large draft horses at 1900 was twice as heavy or more compared to your general riding and cart horse. 

Most of peasant and miner horses were tribal, small, and expendable. Draft horses are 18-steel-wheelers.

20 minutes ago, magnemoe said:

And the connection to the space shuttle is the maximum gauge on an railway as in how wide your cargo can be. Around 3.5 meter who is the width of the shuttle boosters

Oversized - up to 4 480 mm, that's why Proton (4.1 m) and its shroud (4.3 m) can pass, and why the Shuttle payload bay is 4.6 m wide.

ris3-negabarit.PNG

20 minutes ago, magnemoe said:

3.5 meters is still the limit for oversize load who just need oversize load trailing cars on an highway.

Cars, not train cars.

Edited by kerbiloid
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5 hours ago, kerbiloid said:

Yes, the gaps were included in standard from the very beginning. 

Not exactly Roman, but still good.

https://files.stroyinf.ru/Data2/1/4294839/4294839586.htm

The train car (~3.25 m or so) is a platform width for standard rail gauge.

ISO-container width is defined by the train car dimensions.

Most of peasant and miner horses were tribal, small, and expendable. Draft horses are 18-steel-wheelers.

Oversized - up to 4 480 mm, that's why Proton (4.1 m) and its shroud (4.3 m) can pass, and why the Shuttle payload bay is 4.6 m wide.

ris3-negabarit.PNG

Cars, not train cars.

Russia designed the rail line to the launch site so they can run oversize cargo back during the space race, guess they build or expanded the line. 

First use of rails was in mines but this was narrow gauge, then you had horse pulled street cars but they had the rails sunk into the street today, no issue for horses or cars but an bane for bicycles and stuff with small wheels :) 
You also had more standard gauges used in industrial settings before steam, this is that you are talking about but it was also competing wider gauge, not much wider cars but the wheels was farther apart, this would fit your two horse idea better. 

 

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3 hours ago, magnemoe said:

Russia designed the rail line to the launch site so they can run oversize cargo back during the space race, guess they build or expanded the line. 

Proton (UR-500) is originally an ICBM, and it was designed (like everything in OKB-52) to fit the common railroad, to be delivered to any place by rails.

3 hours ago, magnemoe said:

First use of rails was in mines but this was narrow gauge,

The first train was connecting several on-ground mine locations, it wasn't used inside the mine itself.

It had to pass through several existing bridges and tunnels, which were developed for the standard single-carriage road.

After measuring them, subtracting the side parts width, and calculating the widest possible gauge for that, Stephenson got the ugly standard 4' 8.5".
Later in the USA, where they didn't have Roman roads (except in Latin America, lol, because kinda the Romans were there), they rounded it up to nice 5".

As the first railroad in Russia was built under general management of the American engineer and his two Russian former students and assistants, and they had ordered the 5" things, which they had gotten used to, the further railroad development in Russia was following the American 5" standard, while the Europeans were ordering and copying the British things, and they were having a lot of Roman ancestry, so they still have 4' 8.5".

Bad to have too much Roman ancestry.

Edited by kerbiloid
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On 9/20/2023 at 10:56 PM, kerbiloid said:

Interesting fact: a standard horse (rear part) has a width which is accurately matching a half of a standard railroad gauge (4' 8.5" for most of Western countries).

I am assuming this is tongue in cheek. Based on your wealth of knowledge you would be aware that the rail gauge standard you are referring to was based upon the old Roman road standard, which was of course designed around a chariot being pulled by a pair of horses, side by side. Chariots being prioritised due to the Romans constant military actions. So that all other wagons had to have the same wheel base if they were to fit in the grooves left by the chariots. These wagons then being used as the first examples to base a vehicle to be run on rails.

These roads were also the basis for the side of the road that UK cars drove on as you always kept left, because most people wielded their swords with their right hands and so if your enemy was coming towards you you would be ready to defend with your dominant side (sorry to all the left handed people.).

It is why I find it bizzare that in Italy they now drive on the other side. But that is due to where they sourced their first cars from. And of course a certain country felt they needed to do everything opposite from the UK to prove their independence. Driving on the other side and turning switches on by flipping up rather than down, just to to name 2. :)

 

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20 minutes ago, ColdJ said:

These roads were also the basis for the side of the road that UK cars drove on as you always kept left, because most people wielded their swords with their right hands and so if your enemy was coming towards you you would be ready to defend with your dominant side (sorry to all the left handed people.).

I believe, it's just an urban legend for reasons:

1. Because when your opponent is approaching in front, you would want to have your shield (i.e. by default the left hand) at his side, while the right hand is nervously trying to pull out the sword and start waving.

2. Because first both have to put on their helmets, which are several kg heavy, and hard to breathe through.

3. Because it's important to perform all necessary rituals, like the verbal insulting, the glove (preferrably, a metal one) throwing, and other good manners.

3a. Also, a good-mannered gentleman takes off his cloak and puts it on his left hand: to use it as a shield; to unexpectedly throw it into the opponent's face and temporarily blind him, before quickly stabbing; to hide a pistol inside and quickly shoot down that jerk, while verbally demonstrating good manners, before he can pull out the sword.

Spoiler

 

4 but actually 0. Because when you are out of the city police scope, it's much better to wait him behind the trees and do a crosswind attack.

5. Because a knight is assisted by a ten of men, and the robbers rarely walk alone.

Spoiler

 

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20 hours ago, SunlitZelkova said:

The Dr. Strangelove in me wishes the Cold War continued so we could get cool pieces of engineering the the Ulyanovsk class carriers, Yak-41, LOSAT sabot ATGM tank destroyer, and SIDAM 25 SPAAG with Mistral missiles.

Boring compared to 

Still 3000 ton, that make it an destroyer for me, the stuff who escort the battleships and carriers :) 

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Michael  is cool, now I don't think battleship turrets would be very practical, and I used an more modern as in autoloading 5". 
Also a bit weird putting the bombs directly on the trust plate. This would change how it work depending on the load of the magazines and you could get serious issues if one magazine jammed so you became unbalanced. 

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1 minute ago, magnemoe said:

Michael  is cool, now I don't think battleship turrets would be very practical, and I used an more modern as in autoloading 5". 
Also a bit weird putting the bombs directly on the trust plate. This would change how it work depending on the load of the magazines and you could get serious issues if one magazine jammed so you became unbalanced. 

I don't know if you read the book, but Michael was a Hail Mary one-shot. If it didn't work, Earth was out of options. So, a lot of compromises were made.

The "spurt bomb guns" were bomb-pumped x-ray lasers that charged off of the propulsion bombs. And all of the guns on the brick and the missiles in the VLS were firing nuclear weapons, including the 16". They needed a lot of firepower.

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1 minute ago, TheSaint said:

I don't know if you read the book, but Michael was a Hail Mary one-shot. If it didn't work, Earth was out of options. So, a lot of compromises were made.

The "spurt bomb guns" were bomb-pumped x-ray lasers that charged off of the propulsion bombs. And all of the guns on the brick and the missiles in the VLS were firing nuclear weapons, including the 16". They needed a lot of firepower.

Yes, read the book, but did not realize the bombs was on the trust plate. Now using x-ray lasers driven by the pulse bombs was pretty clever. 
Might not be effective as you need to align the laser to back is towards the bomb then detonating and the laser point towards the enemy so you need to be very precise in you aiming but you save on bombs. 

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